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Circular migration, or permanent stay? Evidence from China's rural-urban migration

Listed author(s):
  • Hu, Feng
  • Xu, Zhaoyuan
  • Chen, Yuyu

Although there is a rich literature on internal temporary migration in China, few existing studies deal with the permanent migration decision of China's rural labor. This paper will fill this gap and deal with the permanent migration choice made by rural migrants with the China General Social Survey (CGSS) data. Our results show that compared with their circular counterparts, permanent migrants tend to stay within the home provinces and are more likely to have stable jobs and earn high incomes and thus are more adapted to urban lives. We also find that more educated and more experienced migrants tend to be permanent urban residents, while the relationship of age and the probability of permanent migration is inverse U-shaped. Due to the restrictions of the current hukou system and the lack of rural land rental market, those people with more children and more land at home are more likely to migrate circularly rather than permanently.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1043-951X(10)00102-1
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 22 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 64-74

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:22:y:2011:i:1:p:64-74
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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