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Circular migration, or permanent stay? Evidence from China's rural-urban migration

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  • Hu, Feng
  • Xu, Zhaoyuan
  • Chen, Yuyu

Abstract

Although there is a rich literature on internal temporary migration in China, few existing studies deal with the permanent migration decision of China's rural labor. This paper will fill this gap and deal with the permanent migration choice made by rural migrants with the China General Social Survey (CGSS) data. Our results show that compared with their circular counterparts, permanent migrants tend to stay within the home provinces and are more likely to have stable jobs and earn high incomes and thus are more adapted to urban lives. We also find that more educated and more experienced migrants tend to be permanent urban residents, while the relationship of age and the probability of permanent migration is inverse U-shaped. Due to the restrictions of the current hukou system and the lack of rural land rental market, those people with more children and more land at home are more likely to migrate circularly rather than permanently.

Suggested Citation

  • Hu, Feng & Xu, Zhaoyuan & Chen, Yuyu, 2011. "Circular migration, or permanent stay? Evidence from China's rural-urban migration," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 64-74, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:22:y:2011:i:1:p:64-74
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Su, Yaqin & Tesfazion, Petros & Zhao, Zhong, 2017. "Where Are Migrants from? Inter- vs. Intra-Provincial Rural-Urban Migration in China," IZA Discussion Papers 11029, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. repec:wyi:journl:002171 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Li, Aijun & Zhang, Aizhen, 2012. "Will carbon motivated border tax adjustments function as a threat?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 81-90.
    4. repec:eee:chieco:v:47:y:2018:i:c:p:142-155 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:spr:ariqol:v:13:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11482-017-9521-z is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Feng Hu, 2013. "Does migration benefit the schooling of children left behind?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(2), pages 33-70, July.
    7. Meng, Lei, 2012. "Can grain subsidies impede rural–urban migration in hinterland China? Evidence from field surveys," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 729-741.
    8. Shukui Tan & Yanan Li & Yan Song & Xiang Luo & Min Zhou & Lu Zhang & Bing Kuang, 2017. "Influence factors on settlement intention for floating population in urban area: a China study," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 147-176, January.
    9. Rachel Connelly & Kenneth Roberts & Zhenzhen Zheng, 2011. "The settlement of rural migrants in urban China - some of China's migrants are not 'floating' anymore," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 283-300.
    10. Peng Wang & Jay Pan & Zhehui Luo, 2015. "The Impact of Income Inequality on Individual Happiness: Evidence from China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 413-435, April.
    11. Hirvonen, Kalle & Lilleør, Helene Bie, 2015. "Going Back Home: Internal Return Migration in Rural Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 186-202.
    12. Hu, Feng, 2015. "Return to Education for China’s Return Migrant Entrepreneurs," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 296-307.

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