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Can the Green Economy deliver it all? Experiences of renewable energy policies with socio-economic objectives

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  • Pahle, Michael
  • Pachauri, Shonali
  • Steinbacher, Karoline

Abstract

The Green Economy (GE) paradigm aims to reconcile environmental and socio-economic objectives. Policies to deploy renewable energy (RE) are widely perceived as a way to tap the potential synergies of these objectives. It is, however, still largely unclear whether the potential of simultaneously achieving both environmental and socio-economic objectives can be fully realized, and whether and how multiple objectives influence policy design, implementation, and evaluation. We aim to contribute to this aspect of GE research by looking at selected country experiences of renewable energy deployment with respect to the socio-economic goals of job creation or energy access. Across the cases examined, we find the following implications of relevance for the GE framework: First, we confirm the important role of governmental action for GE, with the specific need to state objectives clearly and build monitoring capacity. Second, consistent with the “strong” green growth variant of GE, some of the cases suggest that while renewable deployment may indeed lead to short-term socio-economic benefits, these benefits may not last. Third, we underline the urgent need for new methodologies to analyze and better understand multiple-objective policies, which are at the heart of the GE paradigm.

Suggested Citation

  • Pahle, Michael & Pachauri, Shonali & Steinbacher, Karoline, 2016. "Can the Green Economy deliver it all? Experiences of renewable energy policies with socio-economic objectives," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 179(C), pages 1331-1341.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:appene:v:179:y:2016:i:c:p:1331-1341
    DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.073
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:appene:v:195:y:2017:i:c:p:370-381 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Giovanni Ferri & Habib Sedehi, 2018. "The System view of the Sustainable Development Goals," CERBE Working Papers wpC26, CERBE Center for Relationship Banking and Economics.
    3. repec:eee:tefoso:v:128:y:2018:i:c:p:304-310 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:637-:d:96069 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:energy:v:139:y:2017:i:c:p:542-554 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Mulder, Machiel & Scholtens, Bert, 2016. "A plant-level analysis of the spill-over effects of the German Energiewende," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 183(C), pages 1259-1271.
    7. repec:eee:appene:v:236:y:2019:i:c:p:1249-1268 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Daniel Ştefan Armeanu & Georgeta Vintilă & Ştefan Cristian Gherghina, 2017. "Does Renewable Energy Drive Sustainable Economic Growth? Multivariate Panel Data Evidence for EU-28 Countries," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(3), pages 1-21, March.
    9. repec:eee:enepol:v:109:y:2017:i:c:p:297-309 is not listed on IDEAS

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