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Organic agriculture values and practices in Portugal and Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Dinis, Isabel
  • Ortolani, Livia
  • Bocci, Riccardo
  • Brites, Cláudia

Abstract

Most definitions of organic farming emphasise a holistic approach that combines quality production with sustainable practices and positive impact on resource conservation, biodiversity and animal welfare. Its founding values were also connected to small-scale production, minimisation of external inputs use, diversification and short market circuits. In the last two decades, organic farming has grown very rapidly, resulting in the subordination of its values to market forces. There has been a greater specialisation, an increase of scale, the involvement of large multinational corporations and the inclusion in global trade. This conventionalisation process and the connected certification standards, primarily focussed on banning the use of pesticides and chemical fertilisers, may weaken the vision of organic farming as a more sustainable alternative to conventional farming.

Suggested Citation

  • Dinis, Isabel & Ortolani, Livia & Bocci, Riccardo & Brites, Cláudia, 2015. "Organic agriculture values and practices in Portugal and Italy," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 39-45.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:136:y:2015:i:c:p:39-45
    DOI: 10.1016/j.agsy.2015.01.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Aubert, M. & Enjolras, G., 2018. "Are EU subsidies a springboard to the reduction of pesticide use?," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277228, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Geoffroy Enjolras & Magali Aubert, 2017. "Are EU subsidies a springboard to the reduction of pesticide use?," Post-Print hal-02048321, HAL.

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