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Impact of Economic Globalization on Human Capital: Evidence from Nigerian Economy

Author

Listed:
  • Sakiru Adebola Solarin

    (Department of Knowledge Management, Multimedia, Economics and Quantitative Analysis, University Malaysia, Melaka, Malaysia,)

  • Olabisi Olabode Eric

    (Department of Economics, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Malaysia.)

Abstract

Investment in human capital in relation to global world is to achieve an optimum return in terms of a gainful employment, productivity and high standard of living. This paper uses autoregressive distributed lag model to determine the cointegration, long run and short run elasticities among human capital, economic growth, economic globalization and foreign direct investment (FDI), for the period 1980-2011. The empirical results reveal that there is a long run relationship among the variables tested in this study. Also, economic growth and FDI show a positive impact on human capital and economic globalization indicates a negative impact on human capital in Nigeria.

Suggested Citation

  • Sakiru Adebola Solarin & Olabisi Olabode Eric, 2015. "Impact of Economic Globalization on Human Capital: Evidence from Nigerian Economy," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(3), pages 786-789.
  • Handle: RePEc:eco:journ1:2015-03-19
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Capital; Economic Globalization; Autoregressive Distributed Lag; Nigeria;

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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