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The dynamics of divorce, income, and female labor force participation in Singapore

  • Lee Chew Ging

    ()

    (Nottingham University Business School, The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus)

  • Ng Pek Kim

    ()

    (Nottingham University Business School, The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus)

Singapore has experienced rising income and female labor force participation over the years. This growth, however, is also accompanied by increasing divorce rate. This paper utilizes Granger causality tests within a multivariate error correction framework to examine the short-run and long-run causal interactions among divorce, income and female labor force participation in Singapore. The long–run results suggest the presence of tradeoffs between income, female labor participation and the family unit, with the twin objectives of economic expansion and the move to draw more women into the labor market having a negative impact on the institution of marriage.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2011/Volume31/EB-11-V31-I4-P248.pdf
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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 31 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 2757-2768

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00549
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  1. Sadhana Srivastava, 2006. "The Role Of Foreign Direct Investment In India'S Services Exports: An Empirical Investigation," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 51(02), pages 175-194.
  2. Johnson, William R & Skinner, Jonathan, 1986. "Labor Supply and Marital Separation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 455-69, June.
  3. Granger, C. W. J., 1988. "Some recent development in a concept of causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1-2), pages 199-211.
  4. Tuck Cheong Tang & Mahendhiran Nair, 2002. "A cointegration analysis of Malaysian import demand function: reassessment from the bounds test," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(5), pages 293-296.
  5. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2006. "Temporal causality and the dynamics of judicial appellate caseload, real income and socio-economic complexity in Australia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(19), pages 2209-2219.
  6. Tuck Cheong Tang, 2002. "Demand for M3 and expenditure components in Malaysia: assessment from bounds testing approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(11), pages 721-725.
  7. Saul D. Hoffman & Greg J. Duncan, 1995. "The Effect of Incomes, Wages, and AFDC Benefits on Marital Disruption," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(1), pages 19-41.
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