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Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Economic Growth? Evidence from a Threshold Regression Analysis

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  • Wu Jyun-Yi

    () (Department of Economics, National Central University)

  • Hsu Chih-Chiang

    () (Department of Economics, National Central University)

Abstract

Using threshold regression techniques developed by Caner and Hansen(2004),this paper examines whether the effect of foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic growth is dependent upon different absorptive capacities. There are three absorptive capacities, namely, initial GDP, human capital and the volume of trade, that are used as threshold variables in our paper. The empirical analysis shows that FDI alone plays an ambiguous role in contributing to economic growth based on a sample of 62 countries covering the period from 1975 through 2000. Under the threshold regression, we find that initial GDP and human capital are important factors in explaining FDI. FDI is found to have a positive and significant impact on growth when host countries have better levels of initial GDP and human capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Wu Jyun-Yi & Hsu Chih-Chiang, 2008. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Economic Growth? Evidence from a Threshold Regression Analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(12), pages 1-10.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-08o10014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Kania-Morales & Robert Mróz, 2014. "Relationship between foreign direct investment stock and foreign portfolio investment stock. Do they really matter for GDP in Poland, Germany, and Great Britain?," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 38.
    2. Trang Thi-Huyen Dinh & Duc Hong Vo & Anh The Vo & Thang Cong Nguyen, 2019. "Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth in the Short Run and Long Run: Empirical Evidence from Developing Countries," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(4), pages 1-11, November.
    3. Miao Miao & Qiaoqi Lang & Dinkneh Gebre Borojo & Jiang Yushi & Xiaoyun Zhang, 2020. "The Impacts of Chinese FDI and China–Africa Trade on Economic Growth of African Countries: The Role of Institutional Quality," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-20, June.
    4. MeiChi Huang, 2017. "Vulnerabilities to housing bubbles: Evidence from linkages between housing prices and income fundamentals," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 64-91, March.
    5. Munyanyi, Musharavati Ephraim, 2017. "Foreign direct investment and economic growth nexus in Zimbabwe: A cointegration approach," MPRA Paper 77946, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Ibhagui, Oyakhilome, 2017. "How Does Foreign Direct Investment Affect Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa? New Evidence from Non-threshold and Threshold Analysis," MPRA Paper 85784, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Ji Uk Kim, 2020. "Technology diffusion, absorptive capacity, and income convergence for Asian developing countries: a dynamic spatial panel approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 59(2), pages 569-598, August.
    8. Ștefan Cristian Gherghina & Liliana Nicoleta Simionescu & Oana Simona Hudea, 2019. "Exploring Foreign Direct Investment–Economic Growth Nexus—Empirical Evidence from Central and Eastern European Countries," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(19), pages 1-33, September.
    9. Nabila Asghar & Samia Nasreen & Hafeez ur Rehman, 2012. "Relationship between FDI and Economic Growth in Selected Asian Countries: A Panel Data Analysis," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 2, pages 84-96, February.
    10. Ji Uk Kim, 2008. "Economic Growth and Technology Diffusion in Developing Countries," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 24, pages 413-424.
    11. Jeffrey A. Edwards & Alfredo A. Romero & Zagros Madjd-Sadjadi, 2016. "Foreign direct investment, economic growth, and volatility: a useful model for policymakers," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(2), pages 681-705, September.
    12. Baiashvili, Tamar & Gattini, Luca, 2020. "Impact of FDI on economic growth: The role of country income levels and institutional strength," EIB Working Papers 2020/02, European Investment Bank (EIB).
    13. Hinh T. Dinh & Thomas G. Rawski & Ali Zafar & Lihong Wang & Eleonora Mavroeidi, 2013. "Tales from the Development Frontier : How China and Other Countries Harness Light Manufacturing to Create Jobs and Prosperity," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15763.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business

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