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Can a Time-to-Plan Model explain the Equity Premium Puzzle


  • Kevin E. Beaubrun-Diant

    () (MODEM-CNRS)


This paper proposes a quantitative evaluation of the time-to-plan technology in order to investigate up to which point this mechanism could constitute a satisfactory alternative to the well-known capital adjustment cost technology. We show that the time-to-plan mechanism reproduces a realistic risk-free rate, whilst being capable of generating a substantial equity premium. About the model's explanation of the business cycle, it turns out that the model predicts a perfectly positive and significant correlation between employment and output.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin E. Beaubrun-Diant, 2005. "Can a Time-to-Plan Model explain the Equity Premium Puzzle," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 7(2), pages 1-8.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04g10006

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michele Boldrin & Lawrence J. Christiano & Jonas D.M. Fisher, 1995. "Asset Pricing Lessons for Modeling Business Cycles," NBER Working Papers 5262, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lawrence J. Christiano & Michele Boldrin & Jonas D. M. Fisher, 2001. "Habit Persistence, Asset Returns, and the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 149-166, March.
    3. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Vigfusson, Robert J., 2003. "Maximum likelihood in the frequency domain: the importance of time-to-plan," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 789-815, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Burkhard Heer & Alfred Maußner, 2013. "Asset Returns, the Business Cycle and the Labor Market," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 14(3), pages 372-397, August.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets
    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment


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