IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Capital accumulation, unemployment, and the putty-clay

  • Javier Birchenall

    ()

    (Department of Economics. University of California, Santa Barbara)

This note studies the dynamics of labor markets in a putty-clay framework. It analyzes the evolution of job creation and job destruction in an economy without market frictions. Unemployment and labor market flows emerge under putty-clay technologies because low productive jobs become unused factors. As capital accumulates, firms destruct low productive jobs by obsolescence. Simultaneously, the use of capital intensive technologies s new jobs by the low substitution between capital and labor.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2004/Volume5/EB-04E20007A.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 5 (2004)
Issue (Month): 19 ()
Pages: 1-8

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04e20007
Contact details of provider:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Charles W. Bischoff, 1971. "Business Investment in the 1970s: A Comparison of Models," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 2(1), pages 13-64.
  2. Calvo, Guillermo A, 1976. "Optimal Growth in a Putty-Clay Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(5), pages 867-78, September.
  3. Abel, Andrew B, 1983. "Energy Price Uncertainty and Optimal Factor Intensity: A Mean-Variance Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(6), pages 1839-45, November.
  4. Dale T. Mortensen & Christopher A. Pissarides, 1993. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," CEP Discussion Papers dp0110, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Mortensen, Dale T., 1994. "The cyclical behavior of job and worker flows," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 1121-1142, November.
  6. Mortensen, Dale T. & Pissarides, Christopher A., 1999. "Job reallocation, employment fluctuations and unemployment," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 18, pages 1171-1228 Elsevier.
  7. Akerlof, George A, 1981. "Jobs as Dam Sites," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 37-49, January.
  8. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04e20007. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.