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Economic Growth, Foreign Direct Investment, Macroeconomic Conditions and Sustainability in Malaysia

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  • Othman, J
  • Jafari, Y
  • Sarmidi, T

Abstract

Most studies on examining the links between economic growth and FDI inflows have relied on the conventional GDP measure which has been argued as inadequate to provide clear insights on the macro sustainability of a country. Alternatively, the Genuine Savings (GS) indicator has been proposed as one of the alternative measures to reflect whether an economy is moving on a sustainable path, albeit in the weak sustainability sense. In this paper, we estimated the impact of FDI on conventional GDP and GS growth as well as on the GDP-GS gap for Malaysia from 1974-2009. The potential nonlinearities associated with the impact of FDI are captured using a macroeconomic conditions indicator as a threshold variable. The results demonstrate stronger FDI impacts on Malaysian GDP and GS growth as well as on reducing the GDP-GS gap once the general macroeconomic conditions in the country reaches a particular level. The results may suggest that FDIs will be more impactful in accelerating future economic growth and sustainability if a country is able to maintain a particular state of macroeconomic conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Othman, J & Jafari, Y & Sarmidi, T, 2014. "Economic Growth, Foreign Direct Investment, Macroeconomic Conditions and Sustainability in Malaysia," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(1), pages 215-226.
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:14:y:2014:i:1_16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Elena G. POPKOVA & Vladislav YUREV & Olga STEPICHEVA & Nikolay DENISOV, 2015. "Transformation And Concentration Of Intellectual Capital As A Factor Of Economic Growth In The Modern Economy," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 15(1), pages 53-60.
    2. Elena Popkova & Oksana Chechina & Aleksandra Sultanova, 2016. "Structural and Logical Model of Contemporary Global Economic System," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(2), pages 218-227.
    3. Kechagia, Polyxeni & Metaxas, Theodore, 2016. "FDI in Central Asia: Uzbekistan," MPRA Paper 71326, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Malaysian macroeconomic conditions; Sustainable development; Genuine savings; Conventional GDP; GDP- Genuine savings gap; Foreign direct investment.;

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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