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Co-ethnic marriage versus intermarriage among immigrants and their descendants: A comparison across seven European countries using event-history analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Tina Hannemann

    (University of Manchester)

  • Hill Kulu

    (University of St Andrews)

  • Leen Rahnu

    (Tallinna Ülikool)

  • Allan Puur

    (Tallinna Ülikool)

  • Mihaela Hărăguş

    (Babeș-Bolyai University)

  • Ognjen Obućina

    (Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED))

  • Amparo González-Ferrer

    (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC))

  • Karel Neels

    (Universiteit Antwerpen)

  • Layla Van den Berg

    (Universiteit Antwerpen)

  • Ariane Pailhé

    (Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED))

  • Gina Potarca

    (Université de Genève)

  • Laura Bernardi

    (Université de Lausanne)

Abstract

Background: Immigrants and their descendants often marry a co-ethnic partner despite the abundance of native-born marriage candidates. The prevalence of co-ethnic marriages and intermarriage among migrants is influenced by their integration level and cultural background as much as individual preferences and structural factors. Objective: This paper expands existing literature on intermarriage by analysing first marriages across European countries, distinguishing marriage type (endogamous versus exogamous) and migrant generations (immigrants versus their descendants). Methods: Data from seven countries was aggregated using the count-data method and was subsequently pooled and analysed together; first, to estimate unadjusted first marriage rates; second, to calculate marriage risks separately by marriage type; and, finally, to directly compare the risk of exogamous and endogamous marriage. Results: There are substantial differences in the prevalence of co-ethnic marriage and intermarriage across the migrant groups. Migrants from non-EU countries often show a high prevalence of co-ethnic marriages and a low risk of intermarriage, whereas migrants from neighbouring countries show a relatively high risk of intermarriage. Conclusions: Ethnic background and early socialisation have strong impacts on the partner choice of migrants and their descendants. The results suggest a strong influence of minority subcultures for some migrant groups, but also intergenerational adaptation processes for others. Contribution: This paper provides an up-to-date comparison of intermarriage rates across seven European countries and two migrant generations, presenting evidence of both similarities and differences across countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Tina Hannemann & Hill Kulu & Leen Rahnu & Allan Puur & Mihaela Hărăguş & Ognjen Obućina & Amparo González-Ferrer & Karel Neels & Layla Van den Berg & Ariane Pailhé & Gina Potarca & Laura Bernardi, 2018. "Co-ethnic marriage versus intermarriage among immigrants and their descendants: A comparison across seven European countries using event-history analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 39(17), pages 487-524.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:39:y:2018:i:17
    DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2018.39.17
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol39/17/39-17.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Europe; mixed marriage; second generation; comparative studies;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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