IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/eurpop/v32y2016i4d10.1007_s10680-016-9377-1.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Partner Choice in Sweden Following a Failed Intermarriage

Author

Listed:
  • Ognjen Obućina

    (Stockholm University Demography Unit (SUDA))

Abstract

This paper is based on the assumption that divorced and separated individuals bring with them the experience of a failed union which may shape their future choices on the marriage market. It aims to contribute to our knowledge of intermarriage, and social interaction in Sweden in general, by comparing the repartnering choices of immigrants and natives in Sweden who had made what is still considered an atypical choice of entering a native-immigrant union with the partner choices of natives and immigrants whose previous union was endogamous. The empirical analysis in this paper is based on the Swedish register data from the STAR data collection (Sweden over Time: Activities and Relations) and covers the period 1990–2007. All the analyses in the paper include individuals aged 20–55 at the time of union dissolution. The multivariate analysis is based on discrete-time multinomial logistic regression. The results show that for all four groups defined by sex and nativity (native men, native women, immigrant men, and immigrant women), there is a positive association between the previous experience of intermarriage and the likelihood of initiating another intermarriage after union dissolution. Another important finding is that the magnitude of this positive association increases with the degree of social distance between the groups involved in the union. Gender differences are modest among natives and somewhat more pronounced among immigrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Ognjen Obućina, 2016. "Partner Choice in Sweden Following a Failed Intermarriage," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(4), pages 511-542, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eurpop:v:32:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s10680-016-9377-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s10680-016-9377-1
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10680-016-9377-1
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1007/s10680-016-9377-1?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Delia Furtado & Stephen J. Trejo, 2013. "Interethnic marriages and their economic effects," Chapters, in: Amelie F. Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann (ed.), International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 15, pages 276-292, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Brienna Perelli-Harris & Nora Sánchez Gassen, 2012. "How Similar Are Cohabitation and Marriage? Legal Approaches to Cohabitation across Western Europe," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 38(3), pages 435-467, September.
    3. Zhenchao Qian, 1997. "Breaking the racial barriers: Variations in interracial marriage between 1980 and 1990," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(2), pages 263-276, May.
    4. Delia Furtado & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2011. "Interethnic marriage: a choice between ethnic and educational similarities," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1257-1279, October.
    5. Barry Chiswick & Christina Houseworth, 2011. "Ethnic intermarriage among immigrants: human capital and assortative mating," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 149-180, June.
    6. Vincent Fu, 2001. "Racial intermarriage pairings," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(2), pages 147-159, May.
    7. Jennifer A. Holland, 2012. "Home and Where the Heart Is: Marriage Timing and Joint Home Purchase [Où se trouve le cœur, là est la maison: Calendrier du mariage et achat conjoint d’un logement]," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 28(1), pages 65-89, February.
    8. Gunnar Andersson & Dimiter Philipov, 2002. "Life-table representations of family dynamics in Sweden, Hungary, and 14 other FFS countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(4), pages 67-144.
    9. Zhiqiang Feng & Paul Boyle & Maarten Ham & Gillian M. Raab, 2012. "Are Mixed-Ethnic Unions More Likely to Dissolve Than Co-Ethnic Unions? New Evidence from Britain [Les unions mixtes sont-elles plus fragiles que les unions entre partenaires de même origine ethniqu," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 28(2), pages 159-176, May.
    10. Torkild Lyngstad & Marika Jalovaara, 2010. "A review of the antecedents of union dissolution," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 23(10), pages 257-292.
    11. Hill Kulu & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2014. "Family Dynamics Among Immigrants and Their Descendants in Europe: Current Research and Opportunities," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 411-435, November.
    12. Matthijs Kalmijn & Frank Tubergen, 2006. "Ethnic intermarriage in the Netherlands: confirmations and refutations of accepted insights," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 22(4), pages 371-397, December.
    13. Vincent Fu, 2010. "Remarriage, Delayed Marriage, and Black/White Intermarriage, 1968–1995," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(5), pages 687-713, October.
    14. Vincenzo Coviello & May Boggess, 2004. "Cumulative incidence estimation in the presence of competing risks," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(2), pages 103-112, June.
    15. John Lievens, 1998. "Interethnic Marriage: Bringing in the Context through Multilevel Modelling," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 14(2), pages 117-155, June.
    16. Nadja Milewski & Hill Kulu, 2014. "Mixed Marriages in Germany: A High Risk of Divorce for Immigrant-Native Couples," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(1), pages 89-113, February.
    17. Jeroen Smits, 2010. "Ethnic Intermarriage and Social Cohesion. What Can We Learn from Yugoslavia?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 96(3), pages 417-432, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Allan Puur & Leen Rahnu & Luule Sakkeus & Martin Klesment & Liili Abuladze, 2018. "The formation of ethnically mixed partnerships in Estonia: A stalling trend from a two-sided perspective," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 38(38), pages 1111-1154.
    2. Leen Rahnu & Allan Puur & Luule Sakkeus & Martin Klesment, 2015. "Partnership dynamics among migrants and their descendants in Estonia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(56), pages 1519-1566.
    3. Amparo González-Ferrer & Ognjen Obućina & Clara Cortina & Teresa Castro Martín, 2018. "Mixed marriages between immigrants and natives in Spain: The gendered effect of marriage market constraints," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 39(1), pages 1-32.
    4. Tina Hannemann & Hill Kulu & Leen Rahnu & Allan Puur & Mihaela Hărăguş & Ognjen Obućina & Amparo González-Ferrer & Karel Neels & Layla Van den Berg & Ariane Pailhé & Gina Potarca & Laura Bernardi, 2018. "Co-ethnic marriage versus intermarriage among immigrants and their descendants: A comparison across seven European countries using event-history analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 39(17), pages 487-524.
    5. Nora Gordon & Sarah Reber, 2018. "The effects of school desegregation on mixed-race births," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(2), pages 561-596, April.
    6. Hill Kulu & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2014. "Family Dynamics Among Immigrants and Their Descendants in Europe: Current Research and Opportunities," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 411-435, November.
    7. Aycan Çelikaksoy, 2014. "Parental Background and Union Formation Behavior of Native Born Individuals in Sweden with a Foreign Background," Societies, MDPI, vol. 4(3), pages 1-12, June.
    8. Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay & Elliott Green, 2018. "Explaining inter-ethnic and inter-religious marriage in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 90, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
    9. Dan Rodríguez-García, 2015. "Intermarriage and Integration Revisited," The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, , vol. 662(1), pages 8-36, November.
    10. Jennifer A. Holland & Kenneth Aarskaug Wiik & Lars Dommermuth, 2018. "Transitions from first unions among immigrants and their descendants. The role of partner choice," Discussion Papers 887, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    11. Annika Elwert, 2020. "Opposites Attract: Assortative Mating and Immigrant–Native Intermarriage in Contemporary Sweden," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 36(4), pages 675-709, September.
    12. Tina Hannemann & Hill Kulu, 2015. "Union formation and dissolution among immigrants and their descendants in the United Kingdom," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(10), pages 273-312.
    13. Ho-Po Crystal Wong, 2016. "Ethnic assortative matching in marriage and family outcomes: evidence from the mass migration to the US during 1900–1930," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 817-848, July.
    14. Nekby, Lena, 2010. "Inter- and Intra-Marriage Premiums Revisited: It’s probably who you are, not who you marry!," SULCIS Working Papers 2010:12, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
    15. Layla Van den Berg & Dimitri Mortelmans, 2022. "Endogamy and relationship dissolution: Does unmarried cohabitation matter?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 47(17), pages 489-528.
    16. Christine Schnor, 2014. "The Effect of Union Status at First Childbirth on Union Stability: Evidence from Eastern and Western Germany," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(2), pages 129-160, May.
    17. Bijia Chen & Cameron Campbell & Hao Dong, 2018. "Interethnic marriage in Northeast China, 1866–1913," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 38(34), pages 929-966.
    18. David M. Wright & Michael Rosato & Dermot O’Reilly, 2017. "Influence of Heterogamy by Religion on Risk of Marital Dissolution: A Cohort Study of 20,000 Couples," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 87-107, February.
    19. Davide Azzolini & Raffaele Guetto & Joan Eliel Madia, 2017. "Do Mixed Unions Foster Integration? The Educational Outcomes of Mixed-Parentage Children in Italy," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 1033-1060, November.
    20. Hill Kulu & Nadja Milewski & Tina Hannemann & Julia Mikolai, 2019. "A decade of life-course research on fertility of immigrants and their descendants in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 40(46), pages 1345-1374.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:eurpop:v:32:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s10680-016-9377-1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.