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Union formation and dissolution among immigrants and their descendants in the United Kingdom

Author

Listed:
  • Tina Hannemann

    (University of Manchester)

  • Hill Kulu

    (University of St Andrews)

Abstract

Background: There is a growing literature on the dynamics of immigrant fertility and mixed marriages, but partnership transitions among immigrants and ethnic minorities are little studied. Objective: This study investigates union formation and dissolution among immigrants and their descendants in the UK. Methods: We use data from the Understanding Society study and apply the techniques of event history analysis. We contrast partnership trajectories of various immigrant groups and compare these with those of the 'native' British population. Results: The analysis shows significant differences in partnership formation and dissolution among immigrants and ethnic minorities. Women of Caribbean origin have the highest cohabitation and the lowest marriage rates, whereas cohabitation remains rare among immigrants from South Asia and their descendants, as most of them marry directly. Immigrants from the Caribbean region and their descendants also show higher divorce rates than 'native' British women, whereas women of South Asian origin have a low divorce risk.

Suggested Citation

  • Tina Hannemann & Hill Kulu, 2015. "Union formation and dissolution among immigrants and their descendants in the United Kingdom," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(10), pages 273-312.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:33:y:2015:i:10
    DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2015.33.10
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol33/10/33-10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alicia Adsera & Barry Chiswick, 2007. "Are there gender and country of origin differences in immigrant labor market outcomes across European destinations?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(3), pages 495-526, July.
    2. Romain Aeberhardt & Denis Fougère & Julien Pouget & Roland Rathelot, 2010. "Wages and employment of French workers with African origin," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 881-905, June.
    3. Ann Berrington & Ian Diamond, 2000. "Marriage or cohabitation: a competing risks analysis of first‐partnership formation among the 1958 British birth cohort," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 163(2), pages 127-151.
    4. Ceri Peach, 1998. "South Asian and Caribbean Ethnic Minority Housing Choice in Britain," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 35(10), pages 1657-1680, October.
    5. Hill Kulu & Nadja Milewski, 2007. "Family change and migration in the life course," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(19), pages 567-590.
    6. Hill Kulu & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2014. "Family Dynamics Among Immigrants and Their Descendants in Europe: Current Research and Opportunities," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 411-435, November.
    7. repec:cai:poeine:pope_605_0645 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Nadja Milewski & Hill Kulu, 2014. "Mixed Marriages in Germany: A High Risk of Divorce for Immigrant-Native Couples," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(1), pages 89-113, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hill Kulu & Tina Hannemann, 2016. "Introduction to research on immigrant and ethnic minority families in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(2), pages 31-46.
    2. Eva Beaujouan & Anne Solaz, 2016. "Are family sizes of parents and children still related? Revisiting the cross-generationalrelationship over the last century," Working Papers 223, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    3. Julia Mikolai & Hill Kulu, 2019. "Union dissolution and housing trajectories in Britain," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 41(7), pages 161-196.
    4. Zheng Mu & Wei-Jun Jean Yeung, 2018. "For Money or for a Life: A Mixed-Method Study on Migration and Time Use in China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 139(1), pages 347-379, August.
    5. Amparo González-Ferrer & Tina Hannemann & Teresa Castro-Martín, 2016. "Partnership formation and dissolution among immigrants in the Spanish context," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(1), pages 1-30.
    6. Sebastian Franke & Hill Kulu, 2018. "Mortality Differences by Partnership Status in England and Wales: The Effect of Living Arrangements or Health Selection?," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 34(1), pages 87-118, February.
    7. Giulia Ferrari & Ariane Pailhé, 2016. "Transition to adulthood in France: Do descendants of immigrants differ from natives ?," Working Papers 50, Institut National d'Etudes Démographiques.
    8. Jennifer A. Holland & Kenneth Aarskaug Wiik & Lars Dommermuth, 2018. "Transitions from first unions among immigrants and their descendants. The role of partner choice," Discussion Papers 887, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    9. Tina Hannemann & Hill Kulu & Leen Rahnu & Allan Puur & Mihaela Hărăguş & Ognjen Obućina & Amparo González-Ferrer & Karel Neels & Layla Van den Berg & Ariane Pailhé & Gina Potarca & Laura Bernardi, 2018. "Co-ethnic marriage versus intermarriage among immigrants and their descendants: A comparison across seven European countries using event-history analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 39(17), pages 487-524.
    10. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Esther Geisler & Teresa Castro-Martín & Tina Hannemann & Valerie Heintz-Martin & Marika Jalovaara & Hill Kulu & Silvia Meggiolaro & Dimitri Mortelmans & Inge Pasteels & Marta Sei, 2017. "Social policies, separation, and second birth spacing in Western Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(37), pages 1245-1274.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigrants; ethnic minorities; second generation; marriage; cohabitation; divorce; separation; United Kingdom;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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