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Cohabitation in Great Britain: not for long, but here to stay

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  • John Ermisch
  • Marco Francesconi

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • John Ermisch & Marco Francesconi, 2000. "Cohabitation in Great Britain: not for long, but here to stay," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 163(2), pages 153-171.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:163:y:2000:i:2:p:153-171
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Balestrino, Alessandro & Ciardi, Cinzia, 2008. "Social norms, cognitive dissonance and the timing of marriage," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2399-2410, December.
    2. Ermisch, John, 2002. "Trying again: repartnering after dissolution of a union," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-19, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Padma Rao Sahib & Xinhua Gu, 2002. "To Tie the Knot or Not," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 6(13), pages 355-382, May.
    4. Ermisch, John, 2000. "Employment opportunities and pre-marital births in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-26, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Balestrino, Alessandro & Ciardi, Cinzia & Mammini, Claudio, 2013. "On the causes and consequences of divorce," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-9.
    6. Júlia Mikolai, 2012. "With Or Without You. Partnership Context Of First Conceptions And Births In Hungary," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 55(5), pages 37-60.
    7. Wendy Sigle, 2008. "England and Wales: Stable fertility and pronounced social status differences," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(15), pages 455-502, July.
    8. repec:spr:eurpop:v:33:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10680-017-9421-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Fiona Steele & Constantinos Kallis & Harvey Goldstein & Heather Joshi, 2005. "The relationship between childbearing and transitions from marriage and cohabitation in Britain," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(4), pages 647-673, November.
    10. Gardner, Jonathan & Oswald, Andrew J., 2007. "Money and mental wellbeing: A longitudinal study of medium-sized lottery wins," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 49-60, January.
    11. repec:spr:eurpop:v:34:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10680-017-9423-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Coles, Melvyn & Francesconi, Marco, 2007. "On the Emergence of Toyboys: Equilibrium Matching with Ageing and Uncertain Careers," IZA Discussion Papers 2612, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Jonathan Gardner & Andrew J. Oswald, 2006. "Do divorcing couples become happier by breaking up?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(2), pages 319-336.
    14. Nazio, Tiziana & Saraceno, Chiara, 2010. "The impact of cohabitation without marriage on intergenerational contacts: A test of the diffusion theory," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship Demographic Development, Social Change, and Social Capital SP I 2010-402, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    15. Jennifer Kohn & Susan Averett, 2014. "Can’t We Just Live Together? New Evidence on the Effect of Relationship Status on Health," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 295-312, September.
    16. Ermisch, John, 2006. "An economic history of bastardy in England and Wales," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-15, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    17. Paul J. Boyle & Hill Kulu, 2006. "Does cohabitation prior to marriage raise the risk of marital dissolution and does this effect vary geographically?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-051, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    18. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0640-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Sigle-Rushton, Wendy, 2008. "England and Wales: stable fertility and pronounced social status differences," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 31307, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    20. repec:spr:jhappi:v:19:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10902-016-9834-x is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Del Bono, Emilia, 2004. "Pre-Marital Fertility and Labour Market Opportunities: Evidence from the 1970 British Cohort Study," IZA Discussion Papers 1320, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    22. Almudena Sevilla-Sanz, 2007. "Division of Household Labor and Cross-Country Differences in Household Formation Rates," Economics Series Working Papers 325, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    23. Brienna Perelli-Harris & Michaela Kreyenfeld & Wendy Sigle-Rushton & Renske Keizer & Trude Lappegård & Aiva Jasilioniene & Caroline Berghammer & Paola Di Giulio & Katja Köppen, 2009. "The increase in fertility in cohabitation across Europe: examining the intersection between union status and childbearing," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    24. Ermisch, John, 2000. "Personal relationships and marriage expectations: evidence from the 1998 British Household Panel Study," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-27, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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