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Does grandparental help mediate the relationship between kin presence and fertility?

Author

Listed:
  • Kristin Snopkowski

    (Boise State University)

  • Rebecca Sear

    (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristin Snopkowski & Rebecca Sear, 2016. "Does grandparental help mediate the relationship between kin presence and fertility?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(17), pages 467-498, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:34:y:2016:i:17
    as

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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol34/17/34-17.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Snopkowski, Kristin & Sear, Rebecca, 2015. "Grandparental help in Indonesia is directed preferentially towards needier descendants: A potential confounder when exploring grandparental influences on child health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 105-114.
    2. Arland Thornton & Ronald Freedman & Te-Hsiung Sun & Ming-Cheng Chang, 1986. "Intergenerational relations and reproductive behavior in Taiwan," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 23(2), pages 185-197, May.
    3. Paul Gertler & John Molyneaux, 1994. "How economic development and family planning programs combined to reduce indonesian fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(1), pages 33-63, February.
    4. Wen-Jen Tsay & C. Y. Cyrus Chu, 2005. "The pattern of birth spacing during Taiwan's demographic transition," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(2), pages 323-336, June.
    5. Jan Beise & Eckart Voland, 2002. "A multilevel event history analysis of the effects of grandmothers on child mortality in a historical German population (Krummhörn, Ostfriesland, 1720-1874)," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-023, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Jan Beise & Eckart Voland, 2002. "A multilevel event history analysis of the effects of grandmothers on child mortality in a historical German population," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(13), pages 469-498, September.
    7. Paul Gertler & Jack Molyneaux, 1994. "Erratum to: How Economic Development and Family Planning Programs Combined to Reduce Indonesian Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(2), pages 1-1, May.
    8. Anu Rammohan & Meliyanni Johar, 2009. "The Determinants of Married Women's Autonomy in Indonesia," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 31-55.
    9. Sophia Rabe-Hesketh & Anders Skrondal & Andrew Pickles, 2004. "Generalized multilevel structural equation modeling," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 69(2), pages 167-190, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility; grandparenting; Indonesia; intergenerational transfers; kin networks;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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