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Tempo and its Tribulations

Author

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  • Kenneth W. Wachter

    (University of California, Berkeley)

Abstract

Bongaarts and Feeney offer alternatives to period life expectancy with a set of demographic measures equivalent to each other under a Proportionality Assumption. Under this assumption, we show that the measures are given by exponentially weighted moving averages of earlier values of period life expectancy. They are indices of mortality conditions in the recent past. The period life expectancy is an index of current mortality conditions. The difference is a difference between past and present, not a ``tempo distortion'' in the present. In contrast, the Bongaarts-Feeney tempo-adjusted Total Fertility Rate is a measure of current fertility conditions, which can be understood in terms of a process of birth-age standardization.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth W. Wachter, 2005. "Tempo and its Tribulations," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 13(9), pages 201-222, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:13:y:2005:i:9
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol13/9/13-9.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James Vaupel, 2002. "Life Expectancy at Current Rates vs. Current Conditions," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(8), pages 365-378, August.
    2. N. Ryder, 1964. "The process of demographic translation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 1(1), pages 74-82, March.
    3. John R. Wilmoth, 2005. "On the relationship between period and cohort mortality," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 13(11), pages 231-280, November.
    4. Evert Imhoff & Nico Keilman, 2000. "On the Quantum and Tempo of Fertility: Comment," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(3), pages 549-553.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Guillot, 2006. "Tempo effects in mortality," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(1), pages 1-26, January.
    2. Joshua Goldstein, 2006. "Found in translation?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(5), pages 71-84, February.
    3. Janet Currie & Hannes Schwandt, 2015. "Short and Long-Term Effects of Unemployment on Fertility," CEP Discussion Papers dp1387, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Marc Luy, 2005. "The importance of mortality tempo-adjustment: theoretical and empirical considerations," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-035, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Máire Ní Bhrolcháin, 2011. "Tempo and the TFR," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(3), pages 841-861, August.
    6. Germán Rodriguez, 2006. "Demographic translation and tempo effects," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(6), pages 85-110, February.
    7. Marc Luy, 2006. "Mortality tempo-adjustment," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 15(21), pages 561-590, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    demographic transition; life expectancy; standardization; tempo; total fertility rate (TFR);

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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