IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/cup/endeec/v13y2008i04p457-473_00.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Decomposing the CO2-income tradeoff: an output distance function approach

Author

Listed:
  • REZEK, JON P.
  • ROGERS, KEVIN

Abstract

The environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis holds that economic growth leads to increases in pollution in early stages of development, but is a significant driver of environmental improvements as income levels increase. Most empirical applications have focused on estimating a reduced form equation in which the measure of environmental degradation is posited as a non-linear function of income. In this paper we develop a structural production model based on an output distance function to investigate the EKC hypothesis for CO 2 in a panel of industrialized countries from 1971 to 2000. This structural approach allows for the decomposition of the observed emission changes into the scale, composition, and productivity effects, thus providing additional insight into the interlinked processes of economic growth and environmental change. The findings from our preferred model indicate that for most countries, the CO 2 -saving productivity effect is not large enough to offset the CO 2 -producing scale effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Rezek, Jon P. & Rogers, Kevin, 2008. "Decomposing the CO2-income tradeoff: an output distance function approach," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(04), pages 457-473, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:13:y:2008:i:04:p:457-473_00
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1355770X08004385
    File Function: link to article abstract page
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Mosheim, 2013. "A shadow distance function decomposition of the environmental Kuznets curve: comparing the South China Sea and the Caribbean," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 457-472, December.
    2. Melenberg, B. & Vollebergh, H.R.J. & Dijkgraaf, E., 2011. "Grazing the Commons : Global Carbon Emissions Forever?," Discussion Paper 2011-020, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. Can, Muhlis & Gozgor, Giray, 2016. "Dynamic Relationships among CO2 Emissions, Energy Consumption, Economic Growth, and Economic Complexity in France," MPRA Paper 70373, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Herrala, Risto & Goel, Rajeev K., 2016. "Sharing the emission reduction burden in an uneven world," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 29-39.
    5. Liu, Lee, 2012. "Environmental poverty, a decomposed environmental Kuznets curve, and alternatives: Sustainability lessons from China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 86-92.
    6. Lau, Lin-Sea & Choong, Chee-Keong & Eng, Yoke-Kee, 2014. "Investigation of the environmental Kuznets curve for carbon emissions in Malaysia: Do foreign direct investment and trade matter?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 490-497.
    7. Tetsuya Tsurumi & Shunsuke Managi, 2010. "Decomposition of the environmental Kuznets curve: scale, technique, and composition effects," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 11(1), pages 19-36, February.
    8. Kibonge Naik, Aziza, 2014. "Agricultural Productivity In Sub-Saharan Africa: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Land-Use Change," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 172350, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Herrala, Risto & Goel, Rajeev K., 2012. "Global CO2 efficiency: Country-wise estimates using a stochastic cost frontier," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 762-770.
    10. repec:spr:envpol:v:19:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10018-016-0172-3 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:13:y:2008:i:04:p:457-473_00. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Keith Waters). General contact details of provider: http://journals.cambridge.org/jid_EDE .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.