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The Timing of Marriage in China

Author

Listed:
  • Lixin Colin Xu

    (The World Bank
    Guanghua School of Management, Peking University)

  • Christine Zhen-Wei Qiang

    (The World Bank)

  • Limin Wang

    (The World Bank)

Abstract

This paper studies the marriage timing decisions of young men and women in China. The data set is a sample of Chinese couples with ample variations in marriage market features, personal characteristics, and regional patterns of growth. Exploiting the differences in marriage timing among the couples in our data set, we find empirical results that are largely consistent with the notion that marriage gains, search costs, and job complexity determine the timing of marriage. In particular, marriage is likely to be delayed for urban (but not rural) men and women with higher wage. Regional economic growth appears to slow down the tendency to get married for both men and women and in both cities and the countryside. Access to network of young people (via the Communist Youth League) facilitates marriage for all young people. Better-educated young people tend to get married later in life.

Suggested Citation

  • Lixin Colin Xu & Christine Zhen-Wei Qiang & Limin Wang, 2003. "The Timing of Marriage in China," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 4(2), pages 343-357, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cuf:journl:y:2003:v:4:i:2:p:343-357
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Marriage timing; Job complexity; Search costs; School-to-work transition;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior

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