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On the distributional effects of income in an aggregate consumption relation

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  • Manisha Chakrabarty
  • Anke Schmalenbach
  • Jeffrey Racine

Abstract

In this paper we analyse the influence of characteristics of the income distribution in modelling aggregate consumption expenditure. We model the aggregate consumption relation of a heterogeneous population, using a statistical distributional approach of aggregation, and apply it to UK-Family Expenditure Survey data. A bootstrap test based on a non-parametric estimation methodology, which accounts for the presence of continuous and discrete variables, suggests that the mean and the dispersion of the income distribution significantly influence aggregate consumption expenditure. Also, the parameters of the aggregate relation are time varying. These findings have implications for constructing empirically sound models of aggregate consumption expenditure.

Suggested Citation

  • Manisha Chakrabarty & Anke Schmalenbach & Jeffrey Racine, 2006. "On the distributional effects of income in an aggregate consumption relation," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1221-1243, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:39:y:2006:i:4:p:1221-1243
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    Cited by:

    1. Michal Paluch & Alois Kneip & Werner Hildenbrand, 2007. "Individual versus Aggregate Income Elasticities for Heterogeneous Populations," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse13_2007, University of Bonn, Germany.
    2. Petr Jakubík, 2011. "Household Balance Sheets and Economic Crisis," Working Papers IES 2011/20, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jun 2011.
    3. Jakubik, Petr, 2011. "Households response to economic crisis," BOFIT Discussion Papers 7/2011, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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