IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/che/chepap/v20y2008i1p20-25.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Plagiarism: Bringing Economics and Education Together (With a Little Help from IT)

Author

Listed:
  • Guy Judge

    (University of Portsmouth)

Abstract

Plagiarism has been acknowledged to be a growing problem for Higher Education Institutions, and indeed in other areas of society. Various reasons have been advanced to explain the growth of this problem, including improvements in IT in general and the Internet in particular, along with changed attitudes towards study amongst some of today’s students. Improved access to the Internet, combined with the development of simple-to-use search tools such as Google, have enabled students quickly and easily to locate relevant material, while improvements in IT training have meant that a greater number of students possess the skills for copying, pasting and reformatting text. In addition a number websites have sprung up offering for sale essays and dissertations to order. Universities have sought to combat plagiarism by making use of text matching tools linked to databases of essays and other content to track down plagiarists. They have also sought to educate both students and staff about what is meant by plagiarism and how to avoid it. This paper describes the experience of one department in a university that has been running a pilot project using the Turnitin software available via JISCiPAS (the JISC Internet Plagiarism Advisory Service) as part of an anti-plagiarism initiative. The discussion also reports on a research project that is underway in the department which seeks to set the problem of plagiarism in an economic context.

Suggested Citation

  • Guy Judge, 2008. "Plagiarism: Bringing Economics and Education Together (With a Little Help from IT)," Computers in Higher Education Economics Review, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 20(1), pages 21-26.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:chepap:v:20:y:2008:i:1:p:20-25
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/cheer/ch20/judge.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alan Collins & Guy Judge & Neil Rickman, 2007. "On the economics of plagiarism," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 93-107, October.
    2. Gary A. Hoover, 2004. "Whose Line Is It? Plagiarism in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(2), pages 487-493, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    RePEc Biblio mentions

    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Economics Profession > Ethics in Economics > Plagiarism

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Aurora A.C. Teixeira & Mariana Fontes da Costa, 2010. "Who rules the ruler? On the misconduct of Journal Editors," OBEGEF Working Papers 005, OBEGEF - Observatório de Economia e Gestão de Fraude;OBEGEF Working Papers on Fraud and Corruption.
    2. Cox, Adam & Craig, Russell & Tourish, Dennis, 2018. "Retraction statements and research malpractice in economics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(5), pages 924-935.
    3. Gary Charness & David Masclet & Marie Claire Villeval, 2014. "The Dark Side of Competition for Status," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 60(1), pages 38-55, January.
    4. Dato, Simon & Nieken, Petra, 2014. "Gender differences in competition and sabotage," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 64-80.
    5. Necker, Sarah, 2014. "Scientific misbehavior in economics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(10), pages 1747-1759.
    6. Schwieren, Christiane & Weichselbaumer, Doris, 2010. "Does competition enhance performance or cheating? A laboratory experiment," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 241-253, June.
    7. Horbach, S.P.J.M.(Serge) & Halffman, W.(Willem), 2019. "The extent and causes of academic text recycling or ‘self-plagiarism’," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 492-502.
    8. Zaggl, Michael A., 2017. "Manipulation of explicit reputation in innovation and knowledge exchange communities: The example of referencing in science," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(5), pages 970-983.
    9. Altug YALCINTAS, 2020. "Why is economics not part of a system of scientific ethics? A review essay on Wilfred Dolfsma and Ioana Negru’s The Ethical Formation of Economists," The Journal of Philosophical Economics, Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies, The Journal of Philosophical Economics, vol. 13(2), pages 202-214, November.
    10. Nicola Lacetera & Lorenzo Zirulia, 2011. "The Economics of Scientific Misconduct," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(3), pages 568-603.
    11. David L. Dickinson & David Masclet, 2021. "Unethical Decision Making and Sleep Restriction: Experimental Evidence," Working Papers 21-09, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    12. Hopp, Christian & Hoover, Gary A., 2017. "How prevalent is academic misconduct in management research?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 73-81.
    13. Altug Yalcintas & Isil Sirin Selcuk, 2016. "Research Ethics Education in Economics," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 74(1), pages 53-74, March.
    14. João Ricardo Faria & Damien Besancenot & Andreas J. Novak, 2011. "Paradigm Depletion, Knowledge Production And Research Effort: Considering Thomas Kuhn'S Ideas," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 587-604, November.
    15. Frank Mueller-Langer & Marc Scheufen, 2013. "Academic publishing and open access," Chapters, in: Ruth Towse & Christian Handke (ed.), Handbook on the Digital Creative Economy, chapter 32, pages 365-377, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    16. Bruce Lewis & Jonathan Duchac & S. Douglas Beets, 2011. "An Academic Publisher’s Response to Plagiarism," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 102(3), pages 489-506, September.
    17. Burton, Michael P. & Rigby, Dan, 2012. "The Market for Essays," 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia 152195, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    18. Rigby, Dan & Burton, Michael & Balcombe, Kelvin & Bateman, Ian & Mulatu, Abay, 2015. "Contract cheating & the market in essays," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 23-37.
    19. Carolin Haeussler & Lin Jiang & Jerry Thursby & Marie C. Thursby, 2009. "Specific and General Information Sharing Among Academic Scientists," NBER Working Papers 15315, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Garret Christensen & Edward Miguel, 2018. "Transparency, Reproducibility, and the Credibility of Economics Research," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 56(3), pages 920-980, September.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:che:chepap:v:20:y:2008:i:1:p:20-25. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/cheer .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Martin Poulter (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/cheer .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.