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An Assessment of International Business Cycle Asymmetries using Clements and Krolzig's Parametric Approach

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  • Belaire-Franch Jorge

    (University of Valencia, Spain)

  • Contreras Dulce

    (University of Valencia, Spain)

Abstract

In a recent paper, Razzak (2001) finds some evidence of two types of asymmetry,steepness and deepness, in international business cycle data, using the nonparametric test of Randles et al. (1980). In this paper, we test for three types of asymmetry: steepness, deepness and sharpness, using the new parametric tests of Clements and Krolzig (2003), in the real GDP of six countries, corresponding to four major economies (U.S., U.K., Japan and Germany) and two small open economies increasingly cited in the literature, Australia and New Zealand. Comparing the Triples test results, corrected for autocorrelation, to Clements and Krolzig's methodology, parametric tests provide stronger evidence of international business cycle asymmetries.

Suggested Citation

  • Belaire-Franch Jorge & Contreras Dulce, 2003. "An Assessment of International Business Cycle Asymmetries using Clements and Krolzig's Parametric Approach," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(4), pages 1-11, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:sndecm:v:6:y:2003:i:4:n:re1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sichel, Daniel E, 1993. "Business Cycle Asymmetry: A Deeper Look," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(2), pages 224-236, April.
    2. Sichel, Daniel E, 1994. "Inventories and the Three Phases of the Business Cycle," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(3), pages 269-277, July.
    3. Clements, Michael P & Krolzig, Hans-Martin, 2003. "Business Cycle Asymmetries: Characterization and Testing Based on Markov-Switching Autoregressions," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 21(1), pages 196-211, January.
    4. Randal J. Verbrugge, 1998. "A cross-country investigation of macroeconomic asymmetries," Macroeconomics 9809017, EconWPA, revised 30 Sep 1998.
    5. Boldin Michael D., 1999. "Should Policy Makers Worry about Asymmetries in the Business Cycle?," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 3(4), pages 1-20, January.
    6. Beaudry, Paul & Koop, Gary, 1993. "Do recessions permanently change output?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 149-163, April.
    7. Philip Rothman, 1998. "Forecasting Asymmetric Unemployment Rates," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 164-168, February.
    8. W.A. Razzak, 2001. "Business Cycle Asymmetries: International Evidence," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(1), pages 230-243, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Veli Yilanci, 2012. "Investigating Asymmetries in Macroeconomic Aggregates of Central and Eastern European Economies," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 14(31), pages 223-229, February.
    2. Li, Shuyun May & Dressler, Scott, 2011. "Business cycle asymmetry via occasionally binding international borrowing constraints," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 33-41, March.
    3. Peter McAdam, 2007. "USA, Japan and the Euro Area: Comparing Business-Cycle Features," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 135-156.
    4. Almeida, Pedro Cameira de & Fuinhas, José Alberto & Marques, António Cardoso, 2011. "A assimetria dos ciclos económicos: Evidência internacional usando o teste triples
      [The asymmetry of business cycles: International evidence using triples test]
      ," MPRA Paper 35208, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Eric Kemp-Benedict, 2017. "A multi-sector Kaleckian-Harrodian model for long-run analysis," Working Papers PKWP1702, Post Keynesian Economics Society (PKES).

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