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Hurricane Katrina and Economic Loss: An Alternative Measure of Economic Activity

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  • Thompson Mark A

    (Augusta State University)

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of Hurricane Katrina on Louisiana's state economy. In particular, I use a state coincident index to assess the economic loss from Hurricane Katrina. This alternative approach provides policymakers with a simple and timely measure of the economy for modeling disasters.

Suggested Citation

  • Thompson Mark A, 2009. "Hurricane Katrina and Economic Loss: An Alternative Measure of Economic Activity," Journal of Business Valuation and Economic Loss Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 1-11, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:jbvela:v:4:y:2009:i:2:n:5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas F Siems, 2005. "Who Supplied My Cheese? Supply Chain Management in the Global Economy," Business Economics, Palgrave Macmillan;National Association for Business Economics, vol. 40(4), pages 6-21, October.
    2. Paulo Guimaraes & Frank L. Hefner & Douglas P. Woodward, 1993. "Wealth And Income Effects Of Natural Disasters: An Econometric Analysis Of Hurricane Hugo," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 23(2), pages 97-114, Fall.
    3. Craig E. Landry & Okmyung Bin & Paul Hindsley & John C. Whitehead & Kenneth Wilson, 2007. "Going Home: Evacuation-Migration Decisions of Hurrican Katrina Survivors," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 326-343, October.
    4. Arthur F. Burns & Wesley C. Mitchell, 1946. "Measuring Business Cycles," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number burn46-1, April.
    5. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1989. "New Indexes of Coincident and Leading Economic Indicators," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1989, Volume 4, pages 351-409 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Theodore M. Crone & Alan Clayton-Matthews, 2005. "Consistent Economic Indexes for the 50 States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(4), pages 593-603, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Marshall & Holly Schrank, 2014. "Small business disaster recovery: a research framework," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 72(2), pages 597-616, June.
    2. Anita Schiller, 2011. "The impact of a storm surge on business establishments in the Houston MSA," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 56(1), pages 331-346, January.
    3. Bradley T. Ewing & Jamie B. Kruse & Mark A. Thompson, 2010. "Measuring the Regional Economic Response to Hurricane Katrina," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 11(2), pages 80-85, July.

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