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Expected Equity Returns and the Demand for Money

Author

Listed:
  • Stern Liliana V

    () (Auburn University)

  • Stern Michael L.

    () (Auburn University)

Abstract

This paper investigates the role of equity markets in the determination of money demand. Expected equity returns are found to be significant determinants of money demand in the long run. We also uncover a strong positive drift in the elasticity of money demand with respect to expected equity returns. Moreover, this elasticity has recently become positive. We explain the puzzle of positive interest elasticity by modifying a conventional model of money demand. We show that if equities are also allowed to provide some liquidity, then the model can support both positive and negative elasticities with respect to expected returns.

Suggested Citation

  • Stern Liliana V & Stern Michael L., 2008. "Expected Equity Returns and the Demand for Money," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-29, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:8:y:2008:i:1:n:18
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Hartley, Peter R, 1988. "The Liquidity Services of Money," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 29(1), pages 1-24, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Franz Seitz & Julian von Landesberger, 2014. "Household Money Holdings in the Euro Area: An Explorative Investigation," Journal of Banking and Financial Economics, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 2(2), pages 83-115, November.

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