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The Money Demand with Random Output and Limited Access to Debt

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  • Mierzejewski, Fernando

Abstract

The money-demand of the economy is characterised, when national output is random and investors cannot attract any level of debt at any moment without incurring in additional costs. The optimal cash balance is then expressed as the probability-quantile (or Value-at-Risk) of the series of capital returns on income, and in this way, it is explicitly determined by risk. As a consequence, the interest-rate-elasticity depends on the kind of risks and expectations, in such a way that the more unstable the economy, the greater the interest-rate-elasticity of the money-demand. Therefore, the effectiveness of monetary policy is increased by diminishing the variability of output. Moreover, since flows of capital can affect the riskiness of financial securities by modifying the amounts involved in transactions, part of the adjustment to reestablish the short-run monetary equilibrium can be performed through volatility shocks. Finally, for different parametrisations of risks, aggregated parameters are expressed as the weighted average of sectorial estimations, so that multiple equilibria of the economy are allowed.

Suggested Citation

  • Mierzejewski, Fernando, 2007. "The Money Demand with Random Output and Limited Access to Debt," MPRA Paper 6688, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6688
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/6688/1/MPRA_paper_6688.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William F. Sharpe, 1965. "Mutual Fund Performance," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39, pages 119-119.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money demand; Monetary policy; Economic capital; Distorted risk principle; Value-at-Risk;

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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