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The Short-Run Monetary Equilibrium with Liquidity Constraints

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  • Mierzejewski, Fernando

Abstract

A theoretical framework is presented to characterise the money demand in deregulated markets. The main departure from the perfect capital markets setting is that, instead of assuming that investors can lend and borrow any amount of capital at a single (and exogenously determined) interest rate, a bounded money supply is considered. The problem of capital allocation can then be formulated in actuarial terms, in such a way that the optimal liquidity demand can be expressed as a Value-at-Risk. Within this framework, the monetary equilibrium determines the rate at which a unit of capital is exchange by a unit of risk, or, in other words, it determines the market price of risk. In a Gaussian setting, such a price is expressed as a mean-to-volatility ratio and can then be regarded as an alternative measure to the Sharpe ratio. Finally, since the model depends on observable variables, it can be verified on the grounds of historical data. The Black Monday (October 1987) and the Dot-Com Bubble (April 2000) episodes can be described (if not explained) on this base.

Suggested Citation

  • Mierzejewski, Fernando, 2007. "The Short-Run Monetary Equilibrium with Liquidity Constraints," MPRA Paper 6526, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6526
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/20231/1/MPRA_paper_20231.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Venter, Gary G., 1991. "Premium Calculation Implications of Reinsurance Without Arbitrage," ASTIN Bulletin: The Journal of the International Actuarial Association, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(02), pages 223-230, November.
    2. J. M. Keynes, 1937. "The General Theory of Employment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 209-223.
    3. Merton H. Miller, 1989. "The Modigliani-Miller Propositions After Thirty Years," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 2(1), pages 6-18.
    4. William F. Sharpe, 1965. "Mutual Fund Performance," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39, pages 119-119.
    5. Dhaene, J. & Denuit, M. & Goovaerts, M. J. & Kaas, R. & Vyncke, D., 2002. "The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 3-33, August.
    6. J. Tobin, 1958. "Liquidity Preference as Behavior Towards Risk," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 65-86.
    7. Wang, Shaun, 1996. "Premium Calculation by Transforming the Layer Premium Density," ASTIN Bulletin: The Journal of the International Actuarial Association, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(01), pages 71-92, May.
    8. Franco Modigliani, 1977. "The monetarist controversy; or, should we forsake stabilization policies?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Spr suppl, pages 27-46.
    9. Wang, Shaun S. & Young, Virginia R. & Panjer, Harry H., 1997. "Axiomatic characterization of insurance prices," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 173-183, November.
    10. Shaun, Wang, 1995. "Insurance pricing and increased limits ratemaking by proportional hazards transforms," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 43-54, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money demand; Monetary equilibrium; Economic capital; Distorted- probability principle; Value-at-Risk;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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