IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Shifting Confidence in Homeownership: The Great Recession

Listed author(s):
  • Bracha Anat

    ()

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Boston)

  • Jamison Julian C.

    ()

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Boston)

We study the responses to several questions related to real estate that were added to the Michigan Survey of Consumers in July and August of 2011. Specifically, we asked about attitudes toward renting versus buying a home; about commuting; and about how much to spend on a mortgage. By matching the results to data about relative house price declines during the recent crisis (at the ZIP-code level), we can study the relationship between the housing crash and individual attitudes. We find that younger respondents are relatively less confident about homeownership after larger declines, while older respondents are relatively more confident. In both cases, this is observed only for those with personal experience of loss (via themselves or someone close) during the crash. We find no effect on attitudes toward commuting, and we find that people who live in the high-decline areas believe it is appropriate to spend more on a mortgage.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejm.2012.12.issue-3/1935-1690.104/1935-1690.104.xml?format=INT
Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics.

Volume (Year): 12 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (October)
Pages: 1-48

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:12:y:2012:i:3:p:1-48:n:5
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://www.degruyter.com

Order Information: Web: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejm

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Fernando Ferreira & Joseph Gyourko, 2011. "Anatomy of the Beginning of the Housing Boom: U.S. Neighborhoods and Metropolitan Areas, 1993-2009," NBER Working Papers 17374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mudd Shannon & Pashev Konstantin & Valev Neven T, 2010. "The Effect of Loss Experiences in a Banking Crisis on Future Expectations and Behavior," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-21, November.
  3. Paola Giuliano & Antonio Spilimbergo, 2009. "Growing Up in a Recession: Beliefs and the Macroeconomy," NBER Working Papers 15321, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Ulrike Malmendier & Stefan Nagel, 2009. "Depression Babies: Do Macroeconomic Experiences Affect Risk-Taking?," NBER Working Papers 14813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Catherine Eckel & Philip J. Grossman & Angela Milano, 2007. "Is More Information Always Better? An Experimental Study of Charitable Giving and Hurrican Katrina," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 388-411, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:12:y:2012:i:3:p:1-48:n:5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.