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Energy Taxes and Oil Price Shocks

Author

Listed:
  • Cremer Helmuth

    () (Toulouse School of Economics, IDEI, GREMAQ and Institut Universitaire de France, Toulouse, France)

  • Gahvari Firouz

    () (Department of Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA)

  • Ladoux Norbert

    () (Toulouse School of Economics, IDEI and LERNA, Toulouse, France)

Abstract

This paper examines if an energy price shock should be compensated by a reduction in energy taxes to mitigate its impact on consumer prices. It shows that the consumer price should not increase by as much as the producer price, implying a small reduction in the energy tax in dollars. The energy tax rate, on the other hand, decreases sharply. This decline is primarily due to an adjustment in the Pigouvian component: A constant marginal social damage being divided by a higher producer price. The redistributive component of the tax remains at about 10% of the social cost of energy.

Suggested Citation

  • Cremer Helmuth & Gahvari Firouz & Ladoux Norbert, 2015. "Energy Taxes and Oil Price Shocks," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 475-501, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:15:y:2015:i:2:p:475-501:n:15
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cremer, Helmuth & Gahvari, Firouz & Ladoux, Norbert, 2010. "Environmental tax design with endogenous earning abilities (with applications to France)," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 82-93, January.
    2. Cremer, Helmuth & Gahvari, Firouz & Ladoux, Norbert, 1998. "Externalities and optimal taxation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 343-364.
    3. Cremer, Helmuth & Gahvari, Firouz & Ladoux, Norbert, 2003. "Environmental taxes with heterogeneous consumers: an application to energy consumption in France," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 2791-2815.
    4. Naito, Hisahiro, 1999. "Re-examination of uniform commodity taxes under a non-linear income tax system and its implication for production efficiency," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 165-188.
    5. Mayeres, Inge & Proost, Stef, 1997. " Optimal Tax and Public Investment Rules for Congestion Type of Externalities," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 99(2), pages 261-279, June.
    6. Cremer, Helmuth & Gahvari, Firouz & Ladoux, Norbert, 2003. "Environmental taxes with heterogeneous consumers: an application to energy consumption in France," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 2791-2815.
    7. Bourguignon, F. & Spadaro, A., 2000. "Social Preferences Revealed through Effective Marginal Tax Rates," DELTA Working Papers 2000-29, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ladoux, Norbert & Scasny, Milan, 2014. "Energy Price and Redistribution in Czech Republic," TSE Working Papers 14-527, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    2. Chen, Zi-yue & Nie, Pu-yan, 2016. "Effects of carbon tax on social welfare: A case study of China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 1607-1615.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies

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