IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bpj/aelcon/v1y2011i1n1.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Note on Accounting and Economic Theory: Past, Present, and Future

Author

Listed:
  • Shubik Martin

    (Yale University)

Abstract

This paper deals with the changing relationship between economic theory and accounting practice and theory. It argues that many of the basic problems encountered in practice cannot be avoided in any attempt to construct an economic theory adequate to handle dynamics. In particular problems of timing become critical. Furthermore, there are several critical problems concerning profit maximization, the nature of the rate of interest, agency problems within the firm and the payment of dividends which cannot be dealt with unless there is an adequate reconciliation of accounting and economic theory. Summary includes: history of accounting and economic theory; types and purpose of accounting; information, valuation and control; open problems in economic theory and accounting; a brief glance at the crystal ball; accounting, economics and organization.

Suggested Citation

  • Shubik Martin, 2011. "A Note on Accounting and Economic Theory: Past, Present, and Future," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-26, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:aelcon:v:1:y:2011:i:1:n:1
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ael.2011.1.1/ael.2011.1.1.1012/ael.2011.1.1.1012.xml?format=INT
    Download Restriction: Download restriction for institutions: For access to full text, subscription to the journal is required. Individual readers who register with De Gruyter Online get free access.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yuri Biondi & Arnaldo Canziani & Thierry Kirat, 2007. "The Firm as an Entity: Implications for Economics, Accounting, and the Law," Post-Print halshs-00203355, HAL.
    2. Ross, Stephen A, 1973. "The Economic Theory of Agency: The Principal's Problem," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(2), pages 134-139, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. E. Grifell-Tatjé & C. Lovell, 2014. "Productivity, price recovery, capacity constraints and their financial consequences," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 3-17, February.
    2. Yuri Biondi & Feng Zhou, 2017. "Interbank Credit and the Money Manufacturing Process. A Systemic Perspective on Financial Stability," Papers 1702.08774, arXiv.org.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:aelcon:v:1:y:2011:i:1:n:1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: https://www.degruyter.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.