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China’s Growing Influence in Southeast Asia – Monetary Policy and Equity Markets


  • Anders C. Johansson


We use structural VAR models with short-run restrictions to analyze the potential transmission of China’s monetary policy shocks to equity markets in Southeast Asia. Our results show that several of the markets in the region are influenced by China’s monetary policy, even though the effect is modest. The impact of a monetary expansion in China is significant and positive for four of the five Southeast Asian equity markets, indicating an increase in demand for goods and services in both China and abroad, which in turn shows up in the foreign equity market. The results provide evidence of China’s growing influence in Southeast Asia and its financial markets. The transmission effect is still quite small, but can be expected to increase if the current trends of deepening economic integration between China and Southeast Asia and a maturing Chinese central bank continue.
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Suggested Citation

  • Anders C. Johansson, 2012. "China’s Growing Influence in Southeast Asia – Monetary Policy and Equity Markets," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(7), pages 816-837, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:35:y:2012:i:7:p:816-837 DOI: j.1467-9701.2012.01435.x

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vespignani, Joaquin L. & Ratti, Ronald A., 2016. "Not all international monetary shocks are alike for the Japanese economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 822-837.
    2. Vespignani, Joaquin L. & Ratti, Ronald A., 2013. "International monetary transmission to the Euro area: Evidence from the U.S., Japan and China," MPRA Paper 49707, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Kang, Wensheng & Ratti, Ronald A. & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2014. "Liquidity expansion in China and the U.S. economy," MPRA Paper 59338, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Vespignani, Joaquin L. & Ratti, Ronald A., 2013. "Chinese Monetary Expansion and the US Economy," Working Papers 16874, University of Tasmania, Tasmanian School of Business and Economics, revised 05 Aug 2013.
    5. Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2015. "International transmission of monetary shocks to the Euro area: Evidence from the U.S., Japan and China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 131-141.
    6. Anupam Nanda & Jia-Huey Yeh, 2016. "International Transmission Mechanisms and Contagion in Housing Markets," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(7), pages 1005-1024, July.
    7. Yiping Huang & Peichu Xie & Jiao Wang, 2014. "International Transmission of the People's Bank of China's Balance Sheet Expansion," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 9(2), pages 276-296, July.
    8. Kang, Wensheng & Ratti, Ronald A. & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2016. "Chinese liquidity increases and the U.S. economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 764-771.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)


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