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Economics in the Backyard: How Much Convergence is there between China and her Special Regions?

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  • Andrew Hughes Hallett
  • Christian Richter

Abstract

This paper tests the hypothesis that the links and dependency relationships between China and her special regions have changed over the past 20 years with the industrialisation of China, and the emergence of Taiwan as a source of investment and sophisticated manufactures, and Hong Kong as financial centre and supplier of services. Has this changed the size and direction of spillovers in the region, and has it curtailed or eliminated American economic leadership? We use time-varying spectral methods to decompose the links between six advanced Asian economies and the US. We find: (a) the links with the US have been weakening, while those within a bloc based on China have strengthened; (b) that this is not new - it has been happening since the 1980s, but has now been reversed by the surge in trade; (c) that Taiwan is more integrated with, and dependent on, the Chinese economy, while Hong Kong continues her separate development based on specialisation and comparative advantage; (d) that the links with the US are rather complex, with the US able to shape the cycles elsewhere through her control of monetary conditions, but the China zone able to control the size of their cycles; and (e) there appears to be no real evidence that pegged exchange rates encourage convergence; in fact the reverse may be true. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Andrew Hughes Hallett & Christian Richter, 2009. "Economics in the Backyard: How Much Convergence is there between China and her Special Regions?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(6), pages 819-861, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:32:y:2009:i:6:p:819-861
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jarko Fidrmuc & Iikka Korhonen & Ivana Bátorová, 2013. "China in the World Economy: Dynamic Correlation Analysis of Business Cycles," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 59(2), pages 392-411, June.
    2. Andrew Hughes Hallett & Christian Richter, 2011. "Trans-Pacific Economic Relations and US-China Business Cycles : Convergence within Asia versus US Economic Leadership," Development Economics Working Papers 23244, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    3. Richard C.K. Burdekin & Yijing Shen & Hsin- hui I.H. Whited, 2013. "Cross- Strait linkages: historica perspective and empirical evidence," Chapters,in: Economic Integration Across the Taiwan Strait, chapter 1, pages 1-29 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Mario Cunha & Christian Richter, 2016. "The impact of climate change on the winegrape vineyards of the Portuguese Douro region," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 138(1), pages 239-251, September.
    5. Mario Cunha & Christian Richter, 2010. "Modelling the Cyclical Behaviour of Wine Production in the Douro Region Using a Time-Varying Parameters Approach," Working Papers 2010.1, International Network for Economic Research - INFER.
    6. Andrew Hughes Hallett & Christian Richter, 2009. "Is the US no longer the economy of first resort? Changing economic relationships in the Asia-Pacific region," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 207-234, July.

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