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Agency In Social Activity Interactions: The Role Of Social Networks In Time And Space

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  • JUAN ANTONIO CARRASCO
  • BERNIE HOGAN
  • BARRY WELLMAN
  • ERIC J. MILLER

Abstract

This paper explores the relationship between travel behaviour, ICT use and social networks. Specifically, we outline a theory of social action that can inform how ICTs relates to social activity travel and explore the efficacy of this theory in an empirical setting. We begin by outlining two factors that influence the propensity to travel: an individual's will to initiate events with members of one's social network, referred to as "agency", and the "social accessibility" of network members themselves. Social accessibility defines a series of practical constraints for social-activity travel and agency defines the extent to which an individual will "actively" work within these constraints to maintain their social network. The theoretical section first unpacks these concepts while embedding them in the research literature, finishing with an operationalisation of agency and social accessibility. Using this theory, the empirical section investigates the relationship between agency, social accessibility, and factors associated with both the respondents and their personal networks. More specifically, we examine how agency levels of interaction are related to differences in demographics, global measures of network structure and composition, and measures of media use, particularly of Internet and telephone. We conclude that individuals who are proximate or more active are more likely to maintain reciprocal relationships, and that more distant or infrequent ties require greater maintenance on the individual's part. We believe that studies of activity-travel and ICTs will benefit from a theoretical lens that articulates some of the transformative effects of ICTs on travel "vis-à-vis" its effects on social life. Social accessibility and agency can help focus that lens thereby enabling researchers to make potentially more elaborate and realistic models that move beyond the spatial and temporal dimensions into social dimensions. Copyright (c) 2008 by the Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Antonio Carrasco & Bernie Hogan & Barry Wellman & Eric J. Miller, 2008. "Agency In Social Activity Interactions: The Role Of Social Networks In Time And Space," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 99(5), pages 562-583, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:tvecsg:v:99:y:2008:i:5:p:562-583
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:transa:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:61-79 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Petr MATOUS & TODO Yasuyuki, 2014. "The Effects of Endogenous Interdependencies on Trade Network Formation across Space among Major Japanese Firms," Discussion papers 14020, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Fariya Sharmeen & Theo Arentze & Harry Timmermans, 2015. "Predicting the evolution of social networks with life cycle events," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(5), pages 733-751, September.
    4. Miguel Picornell & Tomás Ruiz & Maxime Lenormand & José Ramasco & Thibaut Dubernet & Enrique Frías-Martínez, 2015. "Exploring the potential of phone call data to characterize the relationship between social network and travel behavior," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(4), pages 647-668, July.
    5. Lucas, Karen & Bates, John & Moore, José & Carrasco, Juan Antonio, 2016. "Modelling the relationship between travel behaviours and social disadvantage," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 157-173.
    6. Stanley, Janet & Stanley, John & Vella-Brodrick, Dianne & Currie, Graham, 2010. "The place of transport in facilitating social inclusion via the mediating influence of social capital," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 280-286.
    7. Hackney, Jeremy & Marchal, Fabrice, 2011. "A coupled multi-agent microsimulation of social interactions and transportation behavior," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 296-309, May.

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