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Determinants of the EONIA Spread and the Financial Crisis

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  • Carla Soares
  • Paulo M. M. Rodrigues

Abstract

The financial markets turmoil of 2007-09 impacted on the overnight segment, which is the first step of monetary policy implementation. We model the volatility of the EONIA spread as an EGARCH. However, the nature of the EGARCH considered will be different in the period before the fixed rate full allotment policy of the ECB (2004 - 2008) where we follow the approach of Hamilton (1996) and in the period afterwards (2008 - 2009) where a conventional EGARCH seems sufficient to capture the behaviour of volatility. The results suggest a greater difficulty during the turmoil for the ECB to steer the level of the EONIA spread relative to the main reference rate. The liquidity effect has been reduced since 2007 and in particular since the full allotment policy at the refinancing operations. On the other hand, the liquidity policy and especially the provision of long-term liquidity followed was effective in reducing market volatility. Liquidity provision conditions were also found to have influenced the EONIA spread only since the financial market turmoil. Fine-tuning operations contributed to stabilize money market conditions, especially during the turmoil. The EGARCH parameter estimates also suggest a structural change in the behaviour of the EONIA spread in reaction to shocks.
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Suggested Citation

  • Carla Soares & Paulo M. M. Rodrigues, 2013. "Determinants of the EONIA Spread and the Financial Crisis," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 81, pages 82-110, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:81:y:2013:i::p:82-110
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/manc.12010
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    Cited by:

    1. Ciccarelli, Matteo & Maddaloni, Angela & Peydró, José-Luis, 2013. "Heterogeneous transmission mechanism: monetary policy and financial fragility in the euro area," Working Paper Series 1527, European Central Bank.
    2. Ana Sofia Saldanha & Carla Soares, 2015. "The Portuguese money market throughout the crisis: What was the impact of ECB liquidity provision?," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    3. Ronald Heijmans & Lola Hernández & Richard Heuver, 2013. "Determinants of the rate of the Dutch unsecured overnight money market," DNB Working Papers 374, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    4. Renne Jean-Paul, 2017. "A model of the euro-area yield curve with discrete policy rates," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 21(1), pages 99-116, February.
    5. Hernandis, Lucía & Torró, Hipòlit, 2013. "The information content of Eonia swap rates before and during the financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5316-5328.
    6. Ronald Heijmans & Richard Heuver & Zion Gorgi, 2016. "How to monitor the exit from the Eurosystem's unconventional monetary policy: Is EONIA dead and gone?," DNB Working Papers 504, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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