IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Does Interest Rate Volatility Affect The Us Demand For Housing? Evidence From The Autoregressive Distributed Lag Method

Registered author(s):

    This paper investigates empirically the effects of real interest rate volatility on demand for total housing and new housing in the USA. The investigation looks at monthly data from 1975 to 2006 using the autoregressive distributed lag bounds testing approach to co-integration and the Hendry 'general-to-specific' causality test. Three different real rates are applied: mortgage, long term and short term. The results indicate a long-run equilibrium relationship between housing demand and its determinants including interest rate volatility. Results from the causality test indicate housing demand determinants (including interest rate volatility) cause demand for both total and new housing in the long run. Copyright � 2010 The Author. Journal compilation � 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The University of Manchester.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by University of Manchester in its journal The Manchester School.

    Volume (Year): 78 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 4 (07)
    Pages: 326-344

    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:78:y:2010:i:4:p:326-344
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Manchester M13 9PL
    Phone: (0)161 275 4868
    Fax: (0)161 275 4812
    Web page:

    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information: Web:

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Granger, C. W. J., 1988. "Some recent development in a concept of causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1-2), pages 199-211.
    2. James Laurenceson & Joseph C.H. Chai, 2003. "Financial Reform and Economic Development in China," Books, Edward Elgar, number 2714, April.
    3. Reinhart, Carmen & Reinhart, Vincent, 2002. "Una banda cambiaria en el G–3 ¿Es lo mejor para los mercados emergentes?
      [Is a G-3 Target Zone on Target for Emerging Markets?]
      ," MPRA Paper 13694, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Balvers, Ronald J & Szerb, Laszlo, 2000. "Precaution and Liquidity in the Demand for Housing," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 38(2), pages 289-303, April.
    5. Edwards, Sebastian & Susmel, Raul, 2001. "Volatility dependence and contagion in emerging equity markets," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 505-532, December.
    6. Arize, Augustine C & Osang, Thomas & Slottje, Daniel J, 2000. "Exchange-Rate Volatility and Foreign Trade: Evidence from Thirteen LDC's," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 18(1), pages 10-17, January.
    7. Eric van Wincoop & Philippe Bacchetta, 2000. "Does Exchange-Rate Stability Increase Trade and Welfare?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1093-1109, December.
    8. Tim Bollerslev, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 1986/01, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    9. Maddala,G. S. & Kim,In-Moo, 1999. "Unit Roots, Cointegration, and Structural Change," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521587822, October.
    10. Anders Rahbek & Rocco Mosconi, 1999. "Cointegration rank inference with stationary regressors in VAR models," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 2(1), pages 76-91.
    11. K. Giannopoulos, 1995. "Estimating the time Varying Components of international stock markets' risk," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 129-164.
    12. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
    13. Choudhry, Taufiq, 1999. "Does Interest Rate Volatility Affect the US M1 Demand Function? Evidence from Cointegration," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 67(6), pages 621-48, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:78:y:2010:i:4:p:326-344. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing)

    or (Christopher F. Baum)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.