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Hybrid Cat Bonds

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Listed:
  • Pauline Barrieu
  • Henri Loubergé

Abstract

Natural catastrophes attract regularly the media attention and have become a source of public concern. From a financial viewpoint, they represent idiosyncratic risks, diversifiable at the world level. But for various reasons, reinsurance markets are unable to cope with this risk completely. Insurance-linked securities, such as catastrophe (cat) bonds, have been issued to complete the international risk transfer process, but their development is disappointing so far. This article argues that downside risk aversion and ambiguity aversion explain their limited success. Hybrid cat bonds, combining the transfer of cat risk with protection against a stock market crash, are proposed to complete the market. The article shows that replacing simple cat bonds with hybrid cat bonds would lead to an increase in market volume. Copyright (c) The Journal of Risk and Insurance, 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Pauline Barrieu & Henri Loubergé, 2009. "Hybrid Cat Bonds," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 76(3), pages 547-578.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jrinsu:v:76:y:2009:i:3:p:547-578
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. Barro, 2006. "Rare Disasters and Asset Markets in the Twentieth Century," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(3), pages 823-866.
    2. Robert E. Hoyt & Kathleen A. McCullough, 1999. "Catastrophe Insurance Options: Are They Zero-Beta Assets?," Journal of Insurance Issues, Western Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 22(2), pages 147-163.
    3. Philippe Artzner & Freddy Delbaen & Jean-Marc Eber & David Heath, 1999. "Coherent Measures of Risk," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 203-228.
    4. Sujoy Mukerji & Jean-Marc Tallon, 2001. "Ambiguity Aversion and Incompleteness of Financial Markets," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(4), pages 883-904.
    5. Cummins, J. David & Lalonde, David & Phillips, Richard D., 2004. "The basis risk of catastrophic-loss index securities," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 77-111, January.
    6. Barrieu, Pauline & El Karoui, Nicole, 2005. "Inf-convolution of risk measures and optimal risk transfer," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2829, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Rietz, Thomas A., 1988. "The equity risk premium a solution," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 117-131, July.
    8. Pauline Barrieu & Nicole El Karoui, 2005. "Inf-convolution of risk measures and optimal risk transfer," Finance and Stochastics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 269-298, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bjoern Hagendorff & Jens Hagendorff & Kevin Keasey, 2013. "The Shareholder Wealth Effects of Insurance Securitization: Preliminary Evidence from the Catastrophe Bond Market," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 44(3), pages 281-301, December.
    2. Perrakis, Stylianos & Boloorforoosh, Ali, 2013. "Valuing catastrophe derivatives under limited diversification: A stochastic dominance approach," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 3157-3168.
    3. Gibson, Rajna & Habib, Michel A. & Ziegler, Alexandre, 2014. "Reinsurance or securitization: The case of natural catastrophe risk," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 79-100.
    4. Borensztein, Eduardo & Cavallo, Eduardo & Jeanne, Olivier, 2017. "The welfare gains from macro-insurance against natural disasters," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 142-156.
    5. Dionne, Georges & Harrington, Scott, 2017. "Insurance and Insurance Markets," Working Papers 17-2, HEC Montreal, Canada Research Chair in Risk Management.
    6. Marc Gürtler & Martin Hibbeln & Christine Winkelvos, 2016. "The Impact of the Financial Crisis and Natural Catastrophes on CAT Bonds," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 83(3), pages 579-612, September.
    7. Lo, Chien-Ling & Lee, Jin-Ping & Yu, Min-Teh, 2013. "Valuation of insurers’ contingent capital with counterparty risk and price endogeneity," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5025-5035.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies

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