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Quantitative Geography

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  • Alan T. Murray

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of quantitative geography. In addition to discussing what quantitative geography is, the paper details the methods that have come to define it. Six broad categories are used to discuss the range of methods found in quantitative geography: geographic information systems; airborne sensing (global positioning system, photogrammetry, and remote sensing); statistics and exploratory spatial data analysis; mathematics and optimization; regional analysis; and computer science and simulation. Particular emphasis is given to the state of the art in each area and the contributions of geographers, with associated discussion on major unresolved issues and future research directions. Copyright (c) 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan T. Murray, 2010. "Quantitative Geography," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 143-163.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:50:y:2010:i:1:p:143-163
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-9787.2009.00642.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Henry G. Overman, 2010. ""Gis A Job": What Use Geographical Information Systems In Spatial Economics?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 165-180.
    2. Randall Jackson & Walter Schwarm & Yasuhide Okuyama & Samia Islam, 2006. "A method for constructing commodity by industry flow matrices," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 40(4), pages 909-920, December.
    3. Tony H. Grubesic & Timothy C. Matisziw & Alan T. Murray & Diane Snediker, 2008. "Comparative Approaches for Assessing Network Vulnerability," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 31(1), pages 88-112, January.
    4. Geoffrey J.D. Hewings & Yasuhide Okuyama & Michael Sonis, 2001. "Economic Interdependence Within the Chicago Metropolitan Area: A Miyazawa Analysis," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 195-217.
    5. S J Rey & R W Jackson, 1999. "Labor-productivity changes in regional econometric+input - output models," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 31(9), pages 1583-1599, September.
    6. Fischer, Manfred M., 2006. "Neural Networks. A General Framework for Non-Linear Function Approximation," MPRA Paper 77776, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Grubesic, Tony H., 0. "Spatial dimensions of Internet activity," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(7-8), pages 363-387, August.
    8. Sergio J. Rey & Mark V. Janikas, 2004. "STARS: Space-Time Analysis of Regional Systems," Urban/Regional 0406001, EconWPA.
    9. Rey, Sergio J. & Anselin, Luc, 2007. "PySAL: A Python Library of Spatial Analytical Methods," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 37(1), pages 5-27.
    10. Randall Jackson, 1998. "Regionalizing National Commodity-by-Industry Accounts," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 223-238.
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    Cited by:

    1. Luís Aguiar-Conraria & Pedro Magalhães & Maria Soares, 2013. "The nationalization of electoral cycles in the United States: a wavelet analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 387-408, September.
    2. Thomas Vanoutrive, 2011. "Making maps in word and powerpoint Why do regional scientists not draw conclusions?," ERSA conference papers ersa10p882, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Lionel Artige & Leif Neuss, 2014. "A New Shift-Share Method," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 667-683, December.
    4. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0825-6 is not listed on IDEAS

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