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Testing The New Economic Geography: Migrations And Industrial Agglomerations In Spain

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  • Jordi Pons
  • Elisenda Paluzie
  • Javier Silvestre
  • Daniel A. Tirado

Abstract

This paper examines whether access to markets had a significant influence on migration choices of Spanish internal migrants in the interwar years. In it we perform a structural contrast of a New Economic Geography model that focuses on the forward linkage that links workers location choice with the geography of industrial production. The results prove the existence of a direct relation between workers' localization decisions and the market potential of the host regions. This could help to explain the apparently low intensity of internal migrations in Spain until the 1920s as well as its geography. Copyright Blackwell Publishing, Inc. 2007

Suggested Citation

  • Jordi Pons & Elisenda Paluzie & Javier Silvestre & Daniel A. Tirado, 2007. "Testing The New Economic Geography: Migrations And Industrial Agglomerations In Spain," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 289-313.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:47:y:2007:i:2:p:289-313
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Matthieu Crozet, 2004. "Do migrants follow market potentials? An estimation of a new economic geography model," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 439-458, August.
    2. Tabuchi, Takatoshi & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 2002. "Taste heterogeneity, labor mobility and economic geography," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 155-177.
    3. H. Hanson, Gordon, 2005. "Market potential, increasing returns and geographic concentration," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 1-24.
    4. George R. Boyer & Timothy J. Hatton, 1997. "Migration and Labour Market Integration in Late Nineteenth-Century England and Wales," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 50(4), pages 697-734, November.
    5. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    6. Keith Head & John Ries, 2001. "Increasing Returns versus National Product Differentiation as an Explanation for the Pattern of U.S.-Canada Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 858-876, September.
    7. Sukkoo Kim, 1995. "Expansion of Markets and the Geographic Distribution of Economic Activities: The Trends in U. S. Regional Manufacturing Structure, 1860–1987," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 881-908.
    8. Silvestre, Javier, 2005. "Internal migrations in Spain, 1877 1930," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(02), pages 233-265, August.
    9. Sicsic, Pierre, 1992. "City-Farm Wage Gaps in Late Nineteenth-Century France," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(03), pages 675-695, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. María Ayuda & Fernando Collantes & Vicente Pinilla, 2010. "From locational fundamentals to increasing returns: the spatial concentration of population in Spain, 1787–2000," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 25-50, March.
    2. Julio Martinez-Galarraga & Daniel A. Tirado & Rafael González-Val, 2015. "Market potential and regional economic growth in Spain (1860–1930)," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 335-358.
    3. Bode, Eckhardt & Mutl, Jan, 2010. "Testing Nonlinear New Economic Geography Models," Kiel Working Papers 1605, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. Roses, Joan R., 2015. "Spanish land reform in the 1930s: economic necessity or political opportunism?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64498, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Keisuke Kondo & Toshihiro Okubo, 2012. "Structural Estimation and Interregional Labour Migration: Evidence from Japan," Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Discussion Paper Series 2011-040, Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Program.
    6. Peña Sánchez, A.R., 2008. "La distribución regional del capital productivo empresarial en España: Factores determinantes," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 26, pages 277-302, Septiembr.
    7. Kentaro Nakajima & Takatoshi Tabuchi, 2011. "Estimating Interregional Utility Differentials," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 31-46, February.
    8. Maarten Bosker & Waldo Krugell, 2008. "Regional Income Evolution In South Africa After Apartheid," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 493-523.
    9. Herranz-Loncan, Alfonso, 2007. "Infrastructure investment and Spanish economic growth, 1850-1935," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 452-468, July.
    10. Nuria Domeque Claver & Carmen Fillat Castejón & Fernando Sanz Gracia, 2011. "The home market effect in the Spanish industry, 1965–1995," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 46(2), pages 379-396, April.
    11. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0844-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Kancs, d'Artis & Kielyte, Julda, 2010. "European Integration and Labour Migration," European Integration online Papers (EIoP), European Community Studies Association Austria (ECSA-A), vol. 14, November.
    13. Goerlich, Francisco José & Mas, Matilde, 2008. "Empirical Evidence of Population Concentration in Spain, 1900-2001," MPRA Paper 15801, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2008.
    14. Franch Auladell, Xavier & Marti-Henneberg, Jordi & Puig-Farré, Josep, 2013. "A spatial analysis of patterns of growth and concentration of population based on homogeneous population censuses: Spain (1877-2001)," INVESTIGACIONES REGIONALES - Journal of REGIONAL RESEARCH, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 25, pages 43-65.
    15. Javier Silvestre & Vicente Pinilla & Mª Isabel Ayuda, 2011. "The Labor Market Integration of Migrants: Barcelona, 1930," Economic Reports 02-2011, FEDEA.
    16. Elisenda Paluzie & Jordi Pons & Javier Silvestre & Daniel Tirado, 2009. "Migrants and market potential in Spain over the twentieth century: a test of the new economic geography," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 243-265, December.
    17. d'Artis Kancs, 2011. "Labour migration in the enlarged EU: a new economic geography approach," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 171-188.
    18. Timo Mitze & Torben Schmidt, 2015. "Internal migration, regional labor markets and the role of agglomeration economies," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 55(1), pages 61-101, October.
    19. Barbero, Javier & Behrens, Kristian & Zofio, Jose L., 2015. "Industry location and wages: The role of market size and accessibility in trading networks," CEPR Discussion Papers 10411, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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