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City-Farm Wage Gaps in Late Nineteenth-Century France

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  • Sicsic, Pierre

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  • Sicsic, Pierre, 1992. "City-Farm Wage Gaps in Late Nineteenth-Century France," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(03), pages 675-695, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:52:y:1992:i:03:p:675-695_01
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    Cited by:

    1. Javier Silvestre, 2002. "Permanent and temporary internal migrations in Spain, 1877-1936 : determinants and labour market impact," Working Papers 200221, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    2. Jordi Pons Novell & Javier Silvestre & Daniel Aurelio Tirado Fabregat & Elisenda Paluzie Hernandez, 2004. "Were Spanish migrants attracted by industrial agglomerations? An analysis for the interwar years in the light of the new economic geography," Working Papers in Economics 121, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    3. Vincent Bignon & Cecilia Garcia-Peñalosa, 2016. "Protectionism and the Education-Fertility Trade-off in Late 19th Century France," AMSE Working Papers 1604, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised Jan 2016.
    4. Kerstin Enflo & Joan Ramón Rosés, 2015. "Coping with regional inequality in Sweden: structural change, migrations, and policy, 1860–2000," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 191-217, February.
    5. Franck, Raphaël & Johnson, Noel D. & Nye, John V.C., 2014. "From internal taxes to national regulation: Evidence from a French wine tax reform at the turn of the twentieth century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 77-93.
    6. Dalton, John T. & Leung, Tin Cheuk, 2015. "Dispersion and distortions in the trans-Atlantic slave trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 412-425.
    7. Simpson, James, 2000. "Labour markets and rural unrest in Spanish agriculture, 1860-1936," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH 8561, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    8. Alex Mourmouras & Peter Rangazas, 2009. "Reconciling Kuznets and Habbakuk in a unified growth theory," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 149-181, June.
    9. Robert A. Margo, 1995. "The Farm-Nonfarm Wage Gap in the Antebellum United States: Evidence fromthe 1850 and 1860 Censuses of Social Statistics," NBER Historical Working Papers 0072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Jordi Pons & Elisenda Paluzie & Javier Silvestre & Daniel A. Tirado, 2007. "Testing The New Economic Geography: Migrations And Industrial Agglomerations In Spain," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 289-313.
    11. Javier Silvestre & María Isabel Ayuda & Vicente Pinilla, 2015. "The occupational attainment of migrants and natives in Barcelona, 1930," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(3), pages 985-1015, August.
    12. Gilles Postel-Vinay & David E. Sahn, 2010. "Explaining stunting in nineteenth-century France," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(2), pages 315-334, May.

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