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The historiography of French economic growth in the nineteenth century

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  • FranÁois Crouzet

Abstract

There has been a long-standing debate about French nineteenth-century economic growth. After 1945 the 'retardation-stagnation' thesis dominated. From the 1960s 'revisionists' painted a more optimistic view. Recently, 'anti-revisionism' has revived gloomy ideas. New research has been primarily responsible for changes of view. National income estimates, and later cliometric studies, bolstered the revisionist argument. Work on the 'great depression' stimulated anti-revisionism. Scholars have also been influenced by the economic and political state of France at the time they were writing and the debate has been somewhat politicized. The article ends by surveying the 'moderate revisionism' which now prevails. Copyright Economic History Society 2003.

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  • FranÁois Crouzet, 2003. "The historiography of French economic growth in the nineteenth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 56(2), pages 215-242, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:56:y:2003:i:2:p:215-242
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    Cited by:

    1. bertrand blancheton & becuwe stephane & meissner chrispother, 2016. "The First Great Liberalization : Competition, Quality and Productivity," EcoMod2016 9248, EcoMod.
    2. Claude Diebolt & Charlotte Le Chapelain & Audrey Rose Menard, 2018. "Learning outside the factory: the impact of technological change on the rise of adult education in nineteenth-century France," Working Papers of BETA 2018-13, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    3. Cormac Ó Gráda, 2016. "Did Science Cause the Industrial Revolution?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(1), pages 224-239, March.
    4. Stéphane Becuwe & Bertrand Blancheton & Christopher M. Meissner, 2015. "Stages of Diversification: France, 1836-1938," NBER Working Papers 21777, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Raphaël Franck & Oded Galor, 2015. "Is Industrialization Conducive to Long-Run Prosperity?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5354, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Mara P. Squicciarini & Nico Voigtländer, 2015. "Human Capital and Industrialization: Evidence from the Age of Enlightenment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 130(4), pages 1825-1883.
    7. Ho, Chi Pui, 2016. "Rise of Women in Unified Growth Theory: French Development Process and Policy Implications," MPRA Paper 73864, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Raphael Franck & Oded Galor, 2018. "Flowers of Evil? Industrialization and Long Run Development," Working Papers 2018-7, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    9. Raphaël Franck & Oded Galor, 2017. "Technology-Skill Complementarity in Early Phases of Industrialization," NBER Working Papers 23197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Raphaël Franck & Oded Galor, 2017. "Flowers of Evil? Industrial Development and Long-Run Prosperity," NBER Working Papers 23701, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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