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Graft, Bribes, and the Practice of Corruption


  • Juan D. Carrillo


We construct a dynamic model of corruption in organizations where officials privately know their propensity for corruption and clients optimally choose the bribe offered. We show that there is a continuum set of stationary bribe equilibria due exclusively to the dynamic nature of the model and the endogenous determination of bribes. This can explain why similar countries have stable but different "implicit prices" for the same illegal services. We also show that, by not considering the reaction of clients, traditional analysis have systematically overestimated the beneficial effect of increasing wages as an anticorruption measure. Copyright (c) 2000 Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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  • Juan D. Carrillo, 2000. "Graft, Bribes, and the Practice of Corruption," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 257-286, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jemstr:v:9:y:2000:i:3:p:257-286

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Anil Arya & Jonathan Glover & K. Sivaramakrishnan., "undated". "The Interaction between Decision and Control Problems and the Value of Information," Corporate Finance & Organizations _016, Ohio State University.
    10. Florian Ederer, 2010. "Feedback and Motivation in Dynamic Tournaments," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 733-769, September.
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    12. Maria Goltsman & Arijit Mukherjee, 2011. "Interim Performance Feedback in Multistage Tournaments: The Optimality of Partial Disclosure," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(2), pages 229-265.
    13. Aoyagi, Masaki, 2010. "Information feedback in a dynamic tournament," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 242-260, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fahad Khalil & Jacques Lawarrée & Sungho Yun, 2007. "Bribery vs. Extortion: Allowing the Lesser of two Evils," CESifo Working Paper Series 1993, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Michael Dietrich & Jolian McHardy & Abhijit Sharma, 2010. "Firm corruption in the presence of an auditor," Working Papers 2010016, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2010.
    3. Fahad Khalil & Jacques Lawarrée & Sungho Yun, 2010. "Bribery versus extortion: allowing the lesser of two evils," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 41(1), pages 179-198.
    4. Elvio Accinelli & Laura Policardo & Edgar J. Sánchez Carrera, 2012. "On the Dynamics and Effects of Corruption on Environmental Protection," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1312, Department of Economics - dECON.
    5. Daniel Herold, 2017. "The Impact of Incentive Pay on Corporate Crime," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201752, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

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