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The Estimation Of The Incidence Of Employer Contributions To Social Security In Japan

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  • TOSHIAKI TACHIBANAKI
  • YUKIKO YOKOYAMA

Abstract

The present paper estimates the incidence of the employer portion of social security contributions in Japan. One of the purposes of the paper is to examine whether the employer portion is shifted entirely or partly in many industrialized countries. The paper concludes, based on our estimation method, that there is very little apparent backwards shifting on to employees and, therefore, employers bear nearly all of their portion of social security contributions. Firms in Japan could use their contributions to social security for other purposes to reduce the financial burden on firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Toshiaki Tachibanaki & Yukiko Yokoyama, 2008. "The Estimation Of The Incidence Of Employer Contributions To Social Security In Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 59(1), pages 75-83, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:59:y:2008:i:1:p:75-83
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-5876.2007.00380.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. Gordon, 1971. "Inflation in Recession and Recovery," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 2(1), pages 105-166.
    2. Holmlund, Bertil, 1983. " Payroll Taxes and Wage Inflation: The Swedish Experience," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 85(1), pages 1-15.
    3. Beach, Charles M & Balfour, Frederick S, 1983. "Estimated Payroll Tax Incidence and Aggregate Demand for Labour in the United Kingdom," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 50(197), pages 35-48, February.
    4. Komamura, Kohei & Yamada, Atsuhiro, 2004. "Who bears the burden of social insurance? Evidence from Japanese health and long-term care insurance data," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 565-581, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Junya Hamaaki & Yasushi Iwamoto, 2010. "A Reappraisal Of The Incidence Of Employer Contributions To Social Security In Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 61(3), pages 427-441.
    2. HAMAAKI Junya, 2016. "The Incidence of Health Insurance Costs: Empirical evidence from Japan," Discussion papers 16020, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Ángel Melguizo & José González-Páramo, 2013. "Who bears labour taxes and social contributions? A meta-analysis approach," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 247-271, August.
    4. Kodama, Naomi & Yokoyama, Izumi, 2015. "How the 2003 Social Insurance Premium Reform Affects Firm Behavior," CIS Discussion paper series 650, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    5. Sebastian Lazăr & Gheorghe Filip, 2011. "Measuring Corporate Effective Tax Burden In Romania: A Comprehensive Approach," Analele Stiintifice ale Universitatii "Alexandru Ioan Cuza" din Iasi - Stiinte Economice, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, vol. 58, pages 133-144, november.
    6. KODAMA Naomi & YOKOYAMA Izumi, 2017. "Labor Market Impact of Labor Cost Increase without Productivity Gain: A natural experiment from the 2003 social insurance premium reform in Japan," Discussion papers 17093, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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