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Convergence of National Innovation Policy Mixes in Europe – Has It Gone Too Far? An Analysis of Research and Innovation Policy Measures in the Period 2004–12

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  • Kincsö Izsak
  • Paresa Markianidou
  • Slavo Radošević

Abstract

A national innovation policy mix comprises the measures that address the innovation policy challenges of the country in question. The data series of the Erawatch and INNO Policy TrendChart initiatives of the European Commission provide a unique opportunity to explore the profiles of the national innovation policy mixes and their evolution during the past decade. In this article, the innovation policy mix per country and changes in these mixes over time are identified. The analysis covers five main policy mix profiles of the EU Member States. An unexpected similarity and stability is found in the national innovation policy mixes of the Member States even though these countries face different innovation challenges. This reflects extensive transnational policy learning, which is a welcome development, but such a similarity among heterogeneous countries might indicate that innovation policies are not being tailored effectively to the real needs and situations in each Member State.

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  • Kincsö Izsak & Paresa Markianidou & Slavo Radošević, 2015. "Convergence of National Innovation Policy Mixes in Europe – Has It Gone Too Far? An Analysis of Research and Innovation Policy Measures in the Period 2004–12," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 786-802, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jcmkts:v:53:y:2015:i:4:p:786-802
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jcms.12221
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Santos-Arteaga, Francisco J. & Di Caprio, Debora & Tavana, Madjid & O’Connor, Aidan, 2017. "Innovation dynamics and labor force restructuring with asymmetrically developed national innovation systems," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 36-56.

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