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Of Yeast and Mushrooms: Patterns of Industry‐Level Productivity Growth

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  • Robert Inklaar
  • Marcel P. Timmer

Abstract

Abstract. In this paper we analyse labour productivity growth in the United States, four European countries (France, Germany, the Netherlands and United Kingdom), Australia and Canada between 1987 and 2003 from an industry perspective. Rather than analysing broad industry groups, we compare the pattern of growth in all industries through Harberger diagrams. We introduce new summary measures, which indicate the pervasiveness of growth patterns. These indicators show that investment in both information and communication technology (ICT) and non‐ICT capital is fairly balanced or ‘yeasty’, driven by overall macro‐economic conditions. However, growth of total factor productivity (TFP) is much more localized or ‘mushroom‐like’. In particular we find a clear distinction between countries in continental Europe, in which TFP is decelerating after 1995 and becoming more localized, and Anglo‐Saxon countries in which TFP growth is accelerating and becoming more broad‐based, especially after 2000. The increased breadth of Anglo‐Saxon TFP growth is consistent with delayed effects of intangible investments that are complementary to ICT investments.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Inklaar & Marcel P. Timmer, 2007. "Of Yeast and Mushrooms: Patterns of Industry‐Level Productivity Growth," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 8(2), pages 174-187, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:germec:v:8:y:2007:i:2:p:174-187
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0475.2007.00403.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0475.2007.00403.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald & Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2004. "The Case of the Missing Productivity Growth, or Does Information Technology Explain Why Productivity Accelerated in the United States But Not in the United Kingdom?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2003, Volume 18, pages 9-82, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lucia Foster & John Haltiwanger & C. J. Krizan, 2006. "Market Selection, Reallocation, and Restructuring in the U.S. Retail Trade Sector in the 1990s," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 748-758, November.
    3. Marcel P. Timmer & Bart van Ark, 2005. "Does information and communication technology drive EU-US productivity growth differentials?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(4), pages 693-716, October.
    4. Theo Eicher & Oliver Röhn, 2007. "Sources of the German Productivity Demise – Tracing the Effects of Industry-Level ICT Investment," CESifo Working Paper Series 1896, CESifo Group Munich.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marcel P. Timmer & Robert Inklaar & Mary O'Mahony & Bart van Ark, 2011. "Productivity and Economic Growth in Europe: A Comparative Industry Perspective," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 21, pages 3-23, Spring.
    2. repec:dgr:rugggd:gd-137 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald, 2008. "Information and communications technology as a general purpose technology: evidence from U.S. industry data," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 1-15.
    4. Marcel P. Timmer & Ilya B. Voskoboynikov, 2014. "Is Mining Fuelling Long-Run Growth in Russia? Industry Productivity Growth Trends Since 1995," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(S2), pages 398-422, November.
    5. Svante Prado, 2014. "Yeast or mushrooms? Productivity patterns across Swedish manufacturing industries, 1869–1912," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(2), pages 382-408, May.
    6. Alexander Schiersch & Heike Belitz & Martin Gornig, 2012. "Is Technical Progress Sectorally Concentrated?: An Empirical Analysis for Western European Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1217, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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