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Short Selling and the Weekend Effect for NYSE Securities

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  • Benjamin M. Blau
  • Bonnie F. Van Ness
  • Robert A. Van Ness

Abstract

"Using short-sale transactions data, we examine the relation between short selling and the weekend effect. We do not find that short selling is more abundant on Monday than on Friday, even for stocks that have higher Friday returns. We find that short sellers execute more short-sale volume during the middle of the week, and that the positive correlation between short selling and returns on Monday is greater, on average, than the correlation on the other days of the week. Our results are robust to subsamples of stocks with larger weekend effects and stocks that do not have listed options." Copyright (c) 2009 Financial Management Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin M. Blau & Bonnie F. Van Ness & Robert A. Van Ness, 2009. "Short Selling and the Weekend Effect for NYSE Securities," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 38(3), pages 603-630, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:finmgt:v:38:y:2009:i:3:p:603-630
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dumitriu, Ramona & Stefanescu, Razvan, 2013. "DOW effects in returns and in volatility of stock markets during quiet and turbulent times," MPRA Paper 47218, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 02 Apr 2013.
    2. Sascha Füllbrunn & Tibor Neugebauer, 2012. "Margin Trading Bans in Experimental Asset Markets," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-058, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    3. Jinghan Cai & Jibao He & Le Xia & Weili Zhai, 2017. "Weekend Effect and Short Sales: Evidence from Hong Kong," International Journal of Economics and Financial Research, Academic Research Publishing Group, vol. 3(2), pages 8-18, 02-2017.
    4. Benjamin Blau & Chip Wade, 2013. "Comparing the information in short sales and put options," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 567-583, October.
    5. Gao, Pengjie & Hao, Jia & Kalcheva, Ivalina & Ma, Tongshu, 2015. "Short sales and the weekend effect—Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 85-102.
    6. Yan, Zhipeng & Cheng, Lee-Young & Zhao, Yan & Huang, Chung-Yuan, 2016. "Daily short covering activity and the weekend effect: Evidence from Taiwan," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 166-184.
    7. Fink, Jason D. & Fink, Kristin E., 2013. "Hurricane forecast revisions and petroleum refiner equity returns," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 1-11.
    8. Kazemi, Hossein S. & Zhai, Weili & He, Jibao & Cai, Jinghan, 2013. "Stock Market Volatility, Speculative Short Sellers and Weekend Effect: International Evidence," MPRA Paper 54185, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Jul 2013.
    9. James Philpot & Craig A. Peterson, 2011. "A brief history and recent developments in day-of-the-week effect literature," Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(9), pages 808-816, August.
    10. Blau, Benjamin M. & Van Ness, Bonnie F. & Van Ness, Robert A., 2009. "Information and trade sizes: The case of short sales," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 1371-1388, November.
    11. repec:gam:jijfss:v:4:y:2016:i:2:p:7:d:67720 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Bartley R. Danielsen & Robert A. Van Ness & Richard S. Warr, 2009. "Single Stock Futures as a Substitute for Short Sales: Evidence from Microstructure Data," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(9-10), pages 1273-1293.
    13. Crystal Xiaobei Chen, 2012. "The anatomy of short sales and price adjustment: evidence from the Hong Kong stock market," International Journal of Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 8(3), pages 204-218, June.
    14. Foong Soon Cheong, 2016. "Debunking Two Myths of the Weekend Effect," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(2), pages 1-9, April.

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