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Reliance on Income Support in Australia: Prevalence and Persistence

Author

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  • Yi-Ping Tseng

    () (University of Melbourne, Australia)

  • Roger Wilkins

Abstract

Welfare dependence or reliance is widely regarded to have adverse consequences for both the community and welfare recipients, yet there have been few studies of the extent and nature of welfare reliance. Indeed, the concept of welfare reliance does not seem to be well defined. In the present paper, we clarify the meaning of the concept and derive reliance measures consistent with this concept. These measures are applied to describe the extent and nature of reliance on income support payments in Australia of persons aged 15-64 years, using Australian Bureau of Statistics income survey data and Australian government administrative data for income support payments. Copyright 2003 The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Yi-Ping Tseng & Roger Wilkins, 2003. "Reliance on Income Support in Australia: Prevalence and Persistence," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 79(245), pages 196-217, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:79:y:2003:i:245:p:196-217
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    Cited by:

    1. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Sarah C. Dahmann & Nicolás Salamanca & Anna Zhu, 2017. "Intergenerational Disadvantage: Learning about Equal Opportunity from Social Assistance Receipt," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2017n28, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    2. Yi-Ping Tseng & Ha Vu & Roger Wilkins, 2008. "Dynamic Properties of Income Support Receipt in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 41(1), pages 32-55, March.
    3. Immervoll, Herwig & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Königs, Sebastian, 2015. "Are Recipients of Social Assistance 'Benefit Dependent'? Concepts, Measurement and Results for Selected Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 8786, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Elliott Fan & Chris Ryan, 2011. "Reconciling income mobility and welfare persistence," CEPR Discussion Papers 651, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    5. Gray, Matthew & Renda, Jenny, 2006. "Reservation wages and the earnings capacity of lone and couple mothers: Are wage expectations too high?," MPRA Paper 1067, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Robert G. Gregory, 2013. "The Henderson Question? The Melbourne Institute and 50 Years of Welfare Policy," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 46(2), pages 202-215, June.

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