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The Political Economy Of Legal Segregation: Jim Crow And Racial Employment Patterns

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  • Gary M. Anderson
  • Dennis Halcoussis

Abstract

Legal segregation was a fact of life for blacks in the American South during the first half of the present century. These laws are sometimes compared to South African apartheid. However, there seems to be one important difference: Jim Crow, unlike apartheid, did not directly hamper the ability of blacks to compete with whites in labor markets. Our paper explores this problem. We report evidence which suggests that, in spite of the absence of direct labor market restrictions confronting blacks subject to Jim Crow, these laws nevertheless reduced the ability of blacks to compete with whites for jobs. Copyright 1996 Blackwell Publishers Ltd..

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  • Gary M. Anderson & Dennis Halcoussis, 1996. "The Political Economy Of Legal Segregation: Jim Crow And Racial Employment Patterns," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(1), pages 1-15, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecopol:v:8:y:1996:i:1:p:1-15
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert A. Margo, 1990. "Race and Schooling in the South, 1880-1950: An Economic History," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number marg90-1, June.
    2. Ransom, Roger L. & Sutch, Richard, 1986. "The Labor of Older Americans: Retirement of Men On and Off the Job, 1870–1937," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(01), pages 1-30, March.
    3. Lowenberg, Anton D, 1989. "An Economic Theory of Apartheid," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(1), pages 57-74, January.
    4. Maddala,G. S., 1986. "Limited-Dependent and Qualitative Variables in Econometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521338257, April.
    5. Goldin, Claudia, 1992. "Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195072709.
    6. Freeman, Richard B, 1977. "Political Power, Desegregation, and Employment of Black Schoolteachers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(2), pages 299-322, April.
    7. Margo, Robert A & Finegan, T Aldrich, 1993. "The Decline in Black Teenage Labor-Force Participation in the South, 1900-1970: The Role of Schooling," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 234-247, March.
    8. Roback, Jennifer, 1986. "The Political Economy of Segregation: The Case of Segregated Streetcars," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(04), pages 893-917, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Collins, William J., 2003. "The political economy of state-level fair employment laws, 1940-1964," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 24-51, January.
    2. William J. Collins, 2001. "The Political Economy of Race and the Adoption of Fair Employment Laws, 1940-1964," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0104, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.

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