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Inequality Of Subjective Well‐Being As A Comprehensive Measure Of Inequality

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  • Leonard Goff
  • John F. Helliwell
  • Guy Mayraz

Abstract

The link between happiness and overall inequality is best studied using an index that incorporates different aspects of inequality, and is measured consistently in different countries. One such index is the degree to which happiness itself varies among individuals. Its correlation with both happiness levels and social trust is substantially stronger than the corresponding correlation for income inequality. This remains so after allowing for bounded scale reporting, including a purely ordinal measure of dispersion. Moreover, the correlation is stronger for individuals who profess to care most about inequality. The link between happiness and inequality may thus be stronger than previously appreciated. (JEL I31, D6, D63, D31)

Suggested Citation

  • Leonard Goff & John F. Helliwell & Guy Mayraz, 2018. "Inequality Of Subjective Well‐Being As A Comprehensive Measure Of Inequality," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(4), pages 2177-2194, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:56:y:2018:i:4:p:2177-2194
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/ecin.12582
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spr:joecin:v:17:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1007_s10888-018-9398-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. John Helliwell & Haifang Huang & Shun Wang, 2016. "New Evidence on Trust and Well-Being," Working Papers id:11131, eSocialSciences.
    3. repec:eee:ecolet:v:163:y:2018:i:c:p:17-21 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:kap:jecinq:v:17:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1007_s10888-018-9398-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Michal Brzezinski, 2017. "Diagnosing unhappiness dynamics: Evidence from Poland and Russia," Working Papers 2017-27, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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