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Demand Response To Cost Sharing Under Managed Health Care




"We use 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to examine the demand response of ambulatory medical services to demand-side cost sharing under managed health care and find that demand response to a coinsurance rate is less than that under conventional plans. To address the selection problem, only respondents who were offered a single insurance plan from private establishments are studied. Our results show that managed care, relying on different approaches to ration, has blunted demand response. This suggests that in a managed care context, increasing demand-side cost sharing will reduce costs to plans mainly by shifting costs to enrollees. "("JEL "I11) Copyright (c) 2008 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Chunling Lu & Richard G. Frank & Thomas G. Mcguire, 2009. "Demand Response To Cost Sharing Under Managed Health Care," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(1), pages 1-15, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:27:y:2009:i:1:p:1-15

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119, June.
    2. Daniel Polsky & Sean Nicholson, 2004. "Why Are Managed Care Plans Less Expensive: Risk Selection, Utilization, or Reimbursement?," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 71(1), pages 21-40.
    3. Pauly, Mark V. & Ramsey, Scott D., 1999. "Would you like suspenders to go with that belt? An analysis of optimal combinations of cost sharing and managed care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 443-458, August.
    4. Keeler, Emmett B. & Rolph, John E., 1988. "The demand for episodes of treatment in the health insurance experiment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 337-367, December.
    5. Frank, Richard G. & Glazer, Jacob & McGuire, Thomas G., 2000. "Measuring adverse selection in managed health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 829-854, November.
    6. David M. Cutler & Mark McClellan & Joseph P. Newhouse, 2000. "How Does Managed Care Do It?," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 31(3), pages 526-548, Autumn.
    7. Ma, Ching-to Albert & McGuire, Thomas G, 1997. "Optimal Health Insurance and Provider Payment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(4), pages 685-704, September.
    8. Manning, Willard G. & Mullahy, John, 2001. "Estimating log models: to transform or not to transform?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 461-494, July.
    9. McClellan, Mark & Cutler, David & Newhous, Joseph P., 2000. "How Does Managed Care Do It?," Scholarly Articles 2643884, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Magdalena Kozber & Magdalena Osak, 2013. "Wspolplacenie bezposrednie w bazowym systemie zabezpieczenia zdrowotnego – doswiadczenia Szwajcarii. (Direct cost sharing in the basic health system – Swiss experience.)," Problemy Zarzadzania, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 11(41), pages 93-111.
    2. repec:sgm:pzwzuw:v:1:i:2:y:2013:p:93-111 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets


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