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Public capital formation and labor productivity growth in Chile

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  • MD. Ramirez

Abstract

Following the lead of the endogenous growth literature, this article analyzes the impact on labor productivity growth of public and private investment spending in Chile. Using cointegration analysis, the results of the dynamic labor productivity function for the 1960-95 period show that (lagged) public and private investment spending, as well as the rate of growth in exports, has a positive and highly significant effect on the rate of labor productivity growth. The estimates also indicate that increases in government consumption spending have a negative effect on the rate of labor productivity growth, thus suggesting that the composition of government spending may also play an important role in determining the rate of labor productivity growth. The findings call into question the politically expedient policy in many Latin American countries of disproportionately reducing public capital expenditures to meet targeted reductions in the fiscal deficit as a proportion of GDP. Copyright 2000 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • MD. Ramirez, 2000. "Public capital formation and labor productivity growth in Chile," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(2), pages 159-169, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:18:y:2000:i:2:p:159-169
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Miguel D. Ramirez, 1998. "Does Public Investment Enhance Productivity Growth in Mexico? A Cointegration Analysis," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 63-82, Winter.
    2. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    3. Ramirez, Miguel D., 1998. "Does public investment enhance labor productivity growth in Chile? A cointegration analysis," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 45-65.
    4. Corbo, Vittorio, 1989. "Public finance, trade, and development : the Chilean experience," Policy Research Working Paper Series 218, The World Bank.
    5. Moguillansky, Graciela, 1996. "The macroeconomic context and investment: Latin America since 1980," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.
    6. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
    7. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    8. Nelson, Charles R. & Plosser, Charles I., 1982. "Trends and random walks in macroeconmic time series : Some evidence and implications," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-162.
    9. W. Robert & J. Alexander, 1994. "The investment-output ratio in growth regressions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(5), pages 74-76.
    10. Nader Nazmi & Miguel D. Ramirez, 1997. "Public And Private Investment And Economic Growth In Mexico," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(1), pages 65-75, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. AKA, Bédia F, 2007. "Relative Effects Of Public And Private Investment On Cote D’Ivoire’S Economic Performance," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 7(1).
    2. Miguel Ramirez, 2007. "A Panel Unit Root and Panel Cointegration Test of the Complementarity Hypothesis in the Mexican Case: 1960–2001," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 35(3), pages 343-356, September.
    3. Angel De la Fuente, 2010. "Infrastructures and productivity: an updated survey," Working Papers 1018, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.
    4. Ramirez, Miguel D., 2008. "Are Foreign and Public Capital Productive in the Mexican Case? A Panel Unit Root and Panel Cointegration Analysis," Working Papers 49, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    5. Fedderke, J.W. & Bogetic, Z., 2009. "Infrastructure and Growth in South Africa: Direct and Indirect Productivity Impacts of 19 Infrastructure Measures," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1522-1539, September.
    6. Miguel Ramirez, 2008. "What explains Latin America's poor investment performance during the 1980-2001 period?: a panel unit root analysis," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 1-15.
    7. Arroyo Francisco & Edmunds John C., 2010. "The Macro Dimensions of Chile's Export Dilemma," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 9(4), pages 1-19, January.
    8. Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel, 2006. "Chile's Economic Growth," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 43(127), pages 5-48.
    9. Miguel D. Ramirez, 2006. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Enhance Labor Productivity Growth in Chile? A Cointegration Analysis," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 205-220, Spring.

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