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Have Institutional Investors Destabilized Emerging Markets?




In the past few years, there has been a large increase in portfolio capital flows into emerging markets, mostly fueled by mutual funds and other institutional investors. Based on a simple variance ratio test, this paper finds that emerging stock markets as a group experienced a sharp increase in autocorrelation in total returns at a time when institutional investors began to expand significantly their holdings in these markets. These results are consistent with the view that institutional investor sentiment toward emerging markets as an asset class can at times play a critical role in determining asset prices, with shifts in sentiment resulting in periods of bubble-like booms and busts and asset price overshooting. Copyright 1998 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Brian Aitken, 1998. "Have Institutional Investors Destabilized Emerging Markets?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(2), pages 173-184, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:16:y:1998:i:2:p:173-184

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. De Long, J Bradford, et al, 1990. " Positive Feedback Investment Strategies and Destabilizing Rational Speculation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(2), pages 379-395, June.
    2. Andrew W. Lo, A. Craig MacKinlay, 1988. "Stock Market Prices do not Follow Random Walks: Evidence from a Simple Specification Test," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 1(1), pages 41-66.
    3. Cochrane, John H, 1988. "How Big Is the Random Walk in GNP?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(5), pages 893-920, October.
    4. Roll, R., 1989. "Price Volatility, International Market Links, And Their Implications For Regulatory Policies," Papers t10, Columbia - Center for Futures Markets.
    5. Bekaert, Geert & Urias, Michael S, 1996. " Diversification, Integration and Emerging Market Closed-End Funds," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(3), pages 835-869, July.
    6. Fama, Eugene F, 1991. " Efficient Capital Markets: II," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(5), pages 1575-1617, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eduardo Borensztein & R. Gaston Gelos, 2003. "A Panic-Prone Pack? The Behavior of Emerging Market Mutual Funds," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 50(1), pages 1-3.
    2. Rama Cont & Lakshithe Wagalath, 2016. "Institutional Investors And The Dependence Structure Of Asset Returns," International Journal of Theoretical and Applied Finance (IJTAF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 19(02), pages 1-37, March.
    3. Gizelis, Demetrios & Chowdhury, Shah, 2016. "Investor Sentiment and Stock Returns: Evidence from the Athens Stock Exchange," MPRA Paper 71243, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Vivek Arora & Martin Cerisola, 2001. "How Does U.S. Monetary Policy Influence Sovereign Spreads in Emerging Markets?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(3), pages 1-3.
    5. Golder, Stefan M., 1999. "Precautionary credit lines: A means to contain contagion in financial markets?," Kiel Discussion Papers 341, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Rama Cont & Lakshithe Wagalath, 2014. "Institutional Investors and the Dependence Structure of Asset Returns," Working Papers 2014-ACF-01, IESEG School of Management.
    7. Hirshleifer, David & Teoh, Siew Hong, 2008. "Thought and Behavior Contagion in Capital Markets," MPRA Paper 9164, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:aud:audfin:v:15:y:2017:i:147:p:385 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Anchor Y. Lin & Lin-Shang Huang & Mei-Yuan Chen, 2007. "Price Comovement and Institutional Performance Following Large Market Movements," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(5), pages 37-61, October.
    10. Anchor Y. Lin & Lin-Shang Huang & Mei-Yuan Chen, 2007. "Price Comovement and Institutional Performance Following Large Market Movements," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(5), pages 37-61, October.
    11. Kling, Gerhard & Gao, Lei, 2008. "Chinese institutional investors' sentiment," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 374-387, October.
    12. David Hirshleifer & Siew Hong Teoh, 2003. "Herd Behaviour and Cascading in Capital Markets: a Review and Synthesis," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 9(1), pages 25-66.
    13. Lin, Anchor Y., 2006. "Has the Asian crisis changed the role of foreign investors in emerging equity markets: Taiwan's experience," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 364-382.
    14. Lin, Anchor Y. & Swanson, Peggy E., 2008. "Foreigners' perceptions of U.S. markets: Do foreigners exhibit herding tendencies?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 179-203.

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