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Choice for China: What Role for Vocational Education in Green Growth?

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  • Carlo Jaeger

Abstract

Green growth cannot succeed without significant changes in the education system and the closely related social division of labor. This paper combines historical evidence and a game-theoretic analysis to study the relation between vocational education and green growth. It is found that a low-vocation and a high-vocation equilibrium can be distinguished in the interplay between education and labor markets, and that a high-vocation equilibrium is better suited for green growth. At the present stage of development, there are tendencies in both directions in China. Therefore, China has the possibility to successfully implement a green growth strategy by developing a strong vocational education with Chinese characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlo Jaeger, 2014. "Choice for China: What Role for Vocational Education in Green Growth?," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 22(5), pages 55-75, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:chinae:v:22:y:2014:i:5:p:55-75
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1749-124X.2014.12084.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Wolf & Jonas Teitge & Jahel Mielke & Franziska Schütze & Carlo Jaeger, 2021. "The European Green Deal — More Than Climate Neutrality," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 56(2), pages 99-107, March.

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