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Do Nutrition and Health Affect Migrant Workers' Incomes? Some Evidence from Beijing, China

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  • Shi Zheng
  • Zhigang Wang
  • Holly Wang
  • Shunfeng Song

Abstract

Migrant workers have become a major element of the labor force in Chinese cities, making important contributions to the economy while forming a socially disadvantaged group. Existing research on the relationship between the level of nutrition and health and income in China mainly focuses on farmers living in rural areas. Based on a Mincer equation and using a survey in Beijing, this paper examines the relationship between migrant workers' nutrition and health levels and their monthly incomes. We find that the nutrition intake and the body mass index have positive effects on income while duration of illness and daily working hours have negative effects. These conclusions imply that the Chinese Government should put more emphasis on improving migrant workers' well‐being, including offering educational programs on nutrition and health, and enhancing medical insurance and the old‐age insurance system.

Suggested Citation

  • Shi Zheng & Zhigang Wang & Holly Wang & Shunfeng Song, 2010. "Do Nutrition and Health Affect Migrant Workers' Incomes? Some Evidence from Beijing, China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 18(5), pages 105-124, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:chinae:v:18:y:2010:i:5:p:105-124
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-124X.2010.01215.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yao, Yao & Chen, George S. & Salim, Ruhul & Yu, Xiaojun, 2018. "Schooling returns for migrant workers in China: Estimations from the perspective of the institutional environment in a rural setting," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 240-256.
    2. Lijian Qin & Chien-Ping Chen & Xun Liu & Chenggang Wang & Zhongyi Jiang, 2015. "Health Status and Earnings of Migrant Workers from Rural China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 23(2), pages 84-99, March.

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